sharpened

Sharpen vs Sharpened - What's the difference?

sharpen | sharpened |


As verbs the difference between sharpen and sharpened

is that sharpen is (transitive|sometimes|figurative) to make sharp while sharpened is (sharpen).

As an adjective sharpened is

having a sharp point or edge.

Sharpened vs Honed - What's the difference?

sharpened | honed |


As adjectives the difference between sharpened and honed

is that sharpened is having a sharp point or edge while honed is made sharp.

As verbs the difference between sharpened and honed

is that sharpened is (sharpen) while honed is (hone).

Sharpened - What does it mean?

sharpened | |

Sharpener vs Sharpened - What's the difference?

sharpener | sharpened |


As a noun sharpener

is a device for making things sharp.

As an adjective sharpened is

having a sharp point or edge.

As a verb sharpened is

(sharpen).

Sharp vs Sharpened - What's the difference?

sharp | sharpened |


As adjectives the difference between sharp and sharpened

is that sharp is able to cut easily while sharpened is having a sharp point or edge.

As verbs the difference between sharp and sharpened

is that sharp is (music) to raise the pitch of a note half a step making a natural note a sharp while sharpened is (sharpen).

As an adverb sharp

is to a point or edge; piercingly; eagerly; sharply.

As a noun sharp

is (music) the symbol ♯, placed after the name of a note in the key signature or before a note on the staff to indicate that the note is to be played a semitone higher.

Sharpened vs Acerata - What's the difference?

sharpened | acerata |


As adjectives the difference between sharpened and acerata

is that sharpened is having a sharp point or edge while acerata is sharp? sharpened?.

As a verb sharpened

is (sharpen).

What is the difference between sharpened and abatis?

sharpened | abatis |


As a adjective sharpened

is having a sharp point or edge.

As a verb sharpened

is (sharpen).

As a noun abatis is

a means of defense formed by felled trees, or sometimes by bent trees, the ends of whose branches are sharpened and directed outwards, or against the enemy, and more recently fortified with barbed wire {{defdate|mid 19th century}}{{reference-book | last =| first = | authorlink = | coauthors = | editor =brown, lesley | others = | title = the shorter oxford english dictionary | origdate = | origyear = 1933| origmonth = | url = | format = | accessdate = | accessyear = | accessmonth = | edition = 5th | date = | year =2003| month = | publisher =oxford university press | location =oxford, uk | language = | id = | doi = | isbn =978-0-19-860575-7 | lccn = | ol = | pages =2| chapter = | chapterurl = | quote =}}.