sarcasm

Sarcasm vs Salty - What's the difference?

sarcasm | salty |


As a noun sarcasm

is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning.

As an adjective salty is

tasting of salt.

Congenial vs Sarcasm - What's the difference?

congenial | sarcasm |


As an adjective congenial

is having the same or very similar nature, personality, tastes, habits or interests.

As a noun sarcasm is

(uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning.

Hypebole vs Sarcasm - What's the difference?

hypebole | sarcasm |


As a noun sarcasm is

(uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning.

Hyprerbole vs Sarcasm - What's the difference?

hyprerbole | sarcasm |


As a noun sarcasm is

(uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning.

Sarcasm vs Epanorthosis - What's the difference?

sarcasm | epanorthosis |


As nouns the difference between sarcasm and epanorthosis

is that sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning while epanorthosis is (rhetoric) a rhetorical device or element in which a speaker or writer retracts a word that has been spoken and substitutes a stronger or more suitable word; often done for emphasis or sarcasm.

Sarcasm vs Sarcase - What's the difference?

sarcasm | sarcase |


As a noun sarcasm

is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning.

As a verb sarcase is

(nonstandard) to use sarcasm.

Sarcasm vs Insincerity - What's the difference?

sarcasm | insincerity |


As nouns the difference between sarcasm and insincerity

is that sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning while insincerity is property of being insincere, lacking sincerity or truthfulness.

Innuendo vs Sarcasm - What's the difference?

innuendo | sarcasm |


As nouns the difference between innuendo and sarcasm

is that innuendo is a derogatory hint or reference to a person or thing an implication or insinuation while sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning.

Sarcasm vs Smartmouth - What's the difference?

sarcasm | smartmouth |


As a noun sarcasm

is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning.

As a verb smartmouth is

to reply to in a disrespectful, flippant manner.

Sarcasm vs Spite - What's the difference?

sarcasm | spite |


As nouns the difference between sarcasm and spite

is that sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning while spite is ill will or hatred toward another, accompanied with the disposition to irritate, annoy, or thwart; a desire to vex or injure; petty malice; grudge; rancor.

As a verb spite is

to treat maliciously; to try to injure or thwart.

As a preposition spite is

notwithstanding; despite.

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