sarcasm

Censure vs Sarcasm - What's the difference?

censure | sarcasm | Related terms |

Censure is a related term of sarcasm.


As a verb censure

is .

As a noun sarcasm is

(uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning.

Sarcasm vs Railing - What's the difference?

sarcasm | railing | Related terms |

Sarcasm is a related term of railing.


As nouns the difference between sarcasm and railing

is that sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning while railing is a fence or barrier consisting of one or more horizontal rails and vertical supports.

As a verb railing is

.

Sarcasm vs Impudence - What's the difference?

sarcasm | impudence |


As nouns the difference between sarcasm and impudence

is that sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning while impudence is the quality of being impudent, not showing due respect.

Sarcasm vs Sassiness - What's the difference?

sarcasm | sassiness |


As nouns the difference between sarcasm and sassiness

is that sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning while sassiness is the quality of being sassy.

Sarcasm vs Critic - What's the difference?

sarcasm | critic |


As nouns the difference between sarcasm and critic

is that sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning while critic is critic.

As an adjective critic is

critical.

Sarcasm vs Insulting - What's the difference?

sarcasm | insulting |


As nouns the difference between sarcasm and insulting

is that sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning while insulting is the act of giving insult.

As an adjective insulting is

containing insult, or having the intention of insulting.

As a verb insulting is

.

Sarcasm vs Sarcasticness - What's the difference?

sarcasm | sarcasticness |


In uncountable|lang=en terms the difference between sarcasm and sarcasticness

is that sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning while sarcasticness is (uncountable) the quality or state of being sarcastic.

In countable|lang=en terms the difference between sarcasm and sarcasticness

is that sarcasm is (countable) an act of sarcasm while sarcasticness is (countable) the result or product of being sarcastic.

As nouns the difference between sarcasm and sarcasticness

is that sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning while sarcasticness is (uncountable) the quality or state of being sarcastic.

Disdain vs Sarcasm - What's the difference?

disdain | sarcasm |


In uncountable|lang=en terms the difference between disdain and sarcasm

is that disdain is (uncountable) a feeling of contempt or scorn while sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning.

As nouns the difference between disdain and sarcasm

is that disdain is (uncountable) a feeling of contempt or scorn while sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning.

As a verb disdain

is to regard (someone or something) with strong contempt.

Sarcasm vs Flattery - What's the difference?

sarcasm | flattery |


In uncountable|lang=en terms the difference between sarcasm and flattery

is that sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning while flattery is (uncountable) excessive praise or approval, which is often insincere and sometimes contrived to win favour.

In countable|lang=en terms the difference between sarcasm and flattery

is that sarcasm is (countable) an act of sarcasm while flattery is (countable) an instance of excessive praise.

As nouns the difference between sarcasm and flattery

is that sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning while flattery is (uncountable) excessive praise or approval, which is often insincere and sometimes contrived to win favour.

Contempt vs Sarcasm - What's the difference?

contempt | sarcasm |


In uncountable|lang=en terms the difference between contempt and sarcasm

is that contempt is (uncountable) the state of contemning; the feeling or attitude of regarding someone or something as inferior, base, or worthless; scorn, disdain while sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning.

As nouns the difference between contempt and sarcasm

is that contempt is (uncountable) the state of contemning; the feeling or attitude of regarding someone or something as inferior, base, or worthless; scorn, disdain while sarcasm is (uncountable) a sharp form of humor, intended to hurt, that is marked by mocking with irony, sometimes conveyed in speech with vocal over-emphasis insincerely saying something which is the opposite of one's intended meaning, often to emphasize how unbelievable or unlikely it sounds if taken literally, thereby illustrating the obvious nature of one's intended meaning.

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