rough

Primitive vs Rough - What's the difference?

primitive | rough |


As nouns the difference between primitive and rough

is that primitive is an original or primary word; a word not derived from another, as opposed to (derivative) while rough is the unmowed part of a golf course.

As adjectives the difference between primitive and rough

is that primitive is of or pertaining to the beginning or origin, or to early times; original; primordial; primeval; first while rough is having a texture that has much friction not smooth; uneven.

As a verb rough is

to create in an approximate form.

As an adverb rough is

in a rough manner; rudely; roughly.

Rough vs Fight - What's the difference?

rough | fight |


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between rough and fight

is that rough is (obsolete) boisterous weather while fight is (obsolete) a screen for the combatants in ships.

As nouns the difference between rough and fight

is that rough is the unmowed part of a golf course while fight is an occasion of fighting.

As verbs the difference between rough and fight

is that rough is to create in an approximate form while fight is (label) to contend in physical conflict, either singly or in war, battle etc.

As an adjective rough

is having a texture that has much friction not smooth; uneven.

As an adverb rough

is in a rough manner; rudely; roughly.

Rough vs Firm - What's the difference?

rough | firm |


As adjectives the difference between rough and firm

is that rough is having a texture that has much friction not smooth; uneven while firm is steadfast, secure, hard (in position).

As nouns the difference between rough and firm

is that rough is the unmowed part of a golf course while firm is (uk|business) a business partnership; the name under which it trades.

As verbs the difference between rough and firm

is that rough is to create in an approximate form while firm is to make firm or strong; fix securely.

As an adverb rough

is in a rough manner; rudely; roughly.

Rough vs Bad - What's the difference?

rough | bad |


As verbs the difference between rough and bad

is that rough is while bad is .

As an adjective rough

is .

As a noun rough

is .

As an adverb rough

is .

Vague vs Rough - What's the difference?

vague | rough |


As verbs the difference between vague and rough

is that vague is while rough is to create in an approximate form.

As an adjective rough is

having a texture that has much friction not smooth; uneven.

As a noun rough is

the unmowed part of a golf course.

As an adverb rough is

in a rough manner; rudely; roughly.

Slippery vs Rough - What's the difference?

slippery | rough |


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between slippery and rough

is that slippery is (obsolete) wanton; unchaste; loose in morals while rough is (obsolete) boisterous weather.

As adjectives the difference between slippery and rough

is that slippery is of a surface, having low friction, often due to being covered in a non-viscous liquid, and therefore hard to grip, hard to stand on without falling, etc while rough is having a texture that has much friction not smooth; uneven.

As a noun rough is

the unmowed part of a golf course.

As a verb rough is

to create in an approximate form.

As an adverb rough is

in a rough manner; rudely; roughly.

Rough vs Unsubtle - What's the difference?

rough | unsubtle |


As adjectives the difference between rough and unsubtle

is that rough is having a texture that has much friction not smooth; uneven while unsubtle is not subtle; obvious.

As a noun rough

is the unmowed part of a golf course.

As a verb rough

is to create in an approximate form.

As an adverb rough

is in a rough manner; rudely; roughly.

Around vs Rough - What's the difference?

around | rough |


As adjectives the difference between around and rough

is that around is alive; existing while rough is having a texture that has much friction not smooth; uneven.

As adverbs the difference between around and rough

is that around is generally while rough is in a rough manner; rudely; roughly.

As a preposition around

is defining a circle or closed curve containing a thing.

As a noun rough is

the unmowed part of a golf course.

As a verb rough is

to create in an approximate form.

Through vs Rough - What's the difference?

through | rough |


As adjectives the difference between through and rough

is that through is passing from one side of an object to the other while rough is having a texture that has much friction not smooth; uneven.

As adverbs the difference between through and rough

is that through is from one side to the other by way of the interior while rough is in a rough manner; rudely; roughly.

As nouns the difference between through and rough

is that through is a large slab of stone laid on a tomb while rough is the unmowed part of a golf course.

As a preposition through

is from one side of an opening to the other.

As a verb rough is

to create in an approximate form.

Extensive vs Rough - What's the difference?

extensive | rough |


As adjectives the difference between extensive and rough

is that extensive is in the nature of an extent, wide, widespread while rough is having a texture that has much friction not smooth; uneven.

As a noun rough is

the unmowed part of a golf course.

As a verb rough is

to create in an approximate form.

As an adverb rough is

in a rough manner; rudely; roughly.

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