rely

Rely vs Need - What's the difference?

rely | need |


As verbs the difference between rely and need

is that rely is to rest with confidence, as when fully satisfied of the veracity, integrity, or ability of persons, or of the certainty of facts or of evidence; to have confidence; to trust; to depend while need is to be necessary (to someone).

As a noun need is

a requirement for something.

Rely vs Relevant - What's the difference?

rely | relevant |


As a verb rely

is to rest with confidence, as when fully satisfied of the veracity, integrity, or ability of persons, or of the certainty of facts or of evidence; to have confidence; to trust; to depend.

As an adjective relevant is

directly related, connected, or pertinent to a topic.

Rely vs Pity - What's the difference?

rely | pity |


As verbs the difference between rely and pity

is that rely is to rest with confidence, as when fully satisfied of the veracity, integrity, or ability of persons, or of the certainty of facts or of evidence; to have confidence; to trust; to depend while pity is to feel pity for (someone or something).

As a noun pity is

(uncountable) a feeling of sympathy at the misfortune or suffering of someone or something.

As an interjection pity is

short form of what a pity.

Rely vs Depends - What's the difference?

rely | depends |


As verbs the difference between rely and depends

is that rely is to rest with confidence, as when fully satisfied of the veracity, integrity, or ability of persons, or of the certainty of facts or of evidence; to have confidence; to trust; to depend while depends is .

Rely vs Insist - What's the difference?

rely | insist |


As verbs the difference between rely and insist

is that rely is to rest with confidence, as when fully satisfied of the veracity, integrity, or ability of persons, or of the certainty of facts or of evidence; to have confidence; to trust; to depend while insist is to hold up a claim emphatically.

Rely vs Faithful - What's the difference?

rely | faithful |


As a verb rely

is to rest with confidence, as when fully satisfied of the veracity, integrity, or ability of persons, or of the certainty of facts or of evidence; to have confidence; to trust; to depend.

As an adjective faithful is

loyal; adhering firmly to person or cause.

As a noun faithful is

the practicing members of a religion or followers of a cause.

Truly vs Rely - What's the difference?

truly | rely |


As an adverb truly

is in accordance with the facts; truthfully, accurately.

As a verb rely is

to rest with confidence, as when fully satisfied of the veracity, integrity, or ability of persons, or of the certainty of facts or of evidence; to have confidence; to trust; to depend.

Rely vs Centered - What's the difference?

rely | centered |


As verbs the difference between rely and centered

is that rely is to rest with confidence, as when fully satisfied of the veracity, integrity, or ability of persons, or of the certainty of facts or of evidence; to have confidence; to trust; to depend while centered is (center).

As an adjective centered is

pertaining to the location that is middlemost to; located at the center.

Rely vs Lie - What's the difference?

rely | lie |


As verbs the difference between rely and lie

is that rely is to rest with confidence, as when fully satisfied of the veracity, integrity, or ability of persons, or of the certainty of facts or of evidence; to have confidence; to trust; to depend while lie is .

Appeal vs Rely - What's the difference?

appeal | rely |


As verbs the difference between appeal and rely

is that appeal is (obsolete) to accuse (someone of something) while rely is to rest with confidence, as when fully satisfied of the veracity, integrity, or ability of persons, or of the certainty of facts or of evidence; to have confidence; to trust; to depend.

As a noun appeal

is (legal) (a) an application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for re-examination or review (b) the mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected (c) the right of appeal (d) an accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public (e) an accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver.

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