pourpoint

Terms vs Pourpoint - What's the difference?

terms | pourpoint |


As nouns the difference between terms and pourpoint

is that terms is while pourpoint is a quilted military doublet or gambeson worn in the 14th and 15th centuries.

Civilian vs Pourpoint - What's the difference?

civilian | pourpoint |


As nouns the difference between civilian and pourpoint

is that civilian is a person following the pursuits of civil life, especially one who is not an active member of the armed forces while pourpoint is a quilted military doublet or gambeson worn in the 14th and 15th centuries.

As an adjective civilian

is that which is not related to the military, police or other uniformed profession.

Gambeson vs Pourpoint - What's the difference?

gambeson | pourpoint |


As nouns the difference between gambeson and pourpoint

is that gambeson is a defensive garment formerly in use for the body, made of cloth stuffed and quilted while pourpoint is a quilted military doublet or gambeson worn in the 14th and 15th centuries.

Doublet vs Pourpoint - What's the difference?

doublet | pourpoint |


As nouns the difference between doublet and pourpoint

is that doublet is a man’s close-fitting jacket, with or without sleeves men in europe wore doublets from the 1400s to the 1600s while pourpoint is a quilted military doublet or gambeson worn in the 14th and 15th centuries.

Military vs Pourpoint - What's the difference?

military | pourpoint |


As nouns the difference between military and pourpoint

is that military is armed forces while pourpoint is a quilted military doublet or gambeson worn in the 14th and 15th centuries.

As an adjective military

is characteristic of members of the armed forces.

Quilted vs Pourpoint - What's the difference?

quilted | pourpoint |


As an adjective quilted

is having the characteristics of a quilt; specifically, having two layers of cloth sewn together, with a layer of padding between them.

As a verb quilted

is (quilt).

As a noun pourpoint is

a quilted military doublet or gambeson worn in the 14th and 15th centuries.