precipitate

Precipitate vs Animated - What's the difference?

precipitate | animated | Related terms |

Precipitate is a related term of animated.


As verbs the difference between precipitate and animated

is that precipitate is to make something happen suddenly and quickly; hasten while animated is (animate).

As adjectives the difference between precipitate and animated

is that precipitate is headlong; falling steeply or vertically while animated is endowed with life; full of life or spirit; indicating animation; lively; vigorous.

As a noun precipitate

is a product resulting from a process, event, or course of action.

Precipitate vs Furious - What's the difference?

precipitate | furious | Related terms |

Precipitate is a related term of furious.


As adjectives the difference between precipitate and furious

is that precipitate is headlong; falling steeply or vertically while furious is transported with passion or fury; raging; violent.

As a verb precipitate

is to make something happen suddenly and quickly; hasten.

As a noun precipitate

is a product resulting from a process, event, or course of action.

Precipitate vs Incite - What's the difference?

precipitate | incite |


As verbs the difference between precipitate and incite

is that precipitate is to make something happen suddenly and quickly; hasten while incite is .

As a noun precipitate

is a product resulting from a process, event, or course of action.

As an adjective precipitate

is headlong; falling steeply or vertically.

Precipitate vs Accumulate - What's the difference?

precipitate | accumulate |


In lang=en terms the difference between precipitate and accumulate

is that precipitate is to cause (water in the air) to condense or fall to the ground while accumulate is to grow or increase in quantity or number; to increase greatly.

As verbs the difference between precipitate and accumulate

is that precipitate is to make something happen suddenly and quickly; hasten while accumulate is to heap up in a mass; to pile up; to collect or bring together; to amass.

As adjectives the difference between precipitate and accumulate

is that precipitate is headlong; falling steeply or vertically while accumulate is (poetic|rare) collected; accumulated.

As a noun precipitate

is a product resulting from a process, event, or course of action.

Trigger vs Precipitate - What's the difference?

trigger | precipitate |


In lang=en terms the difference between trigger and precipitate

is that trigger is to spark a response, especially a negative emotional response, in (someone) while precipitate is to cause (water in the air) to condense or fall to the ground.

As nouns the difference between trigger and precipitate

is that trigger is a finger-operated lever used to fire a gun while precipitate is a product resulting from a process, event, or course of action.

As verbs the difference between trigger and precipitate

is that trigger is to fire a weapon while precipitate is to make something happen suddenly and quickly; hasten.

As an adjective precipitate is

headlong; falling steeply or vertically.

Precipitate vs Aggravate - What's the difference?

precipitate | aggravate |


As verbs the difference between precipitate and aggravate

is that precipitate is to make something happen suddenly and quickly; hasten while aggravate is to make worse, or more severe; to render less tolerable or less excusable; to make more offensive; to enhance; to intensify.

As a noun precipitate

is a product resulting from a process, event, or course of action.

As an adjective precipitate

is headlong; falling steeply or vertically.

Foolhardy vs Precipitate - What's the difference?

foolhardy | precipitate | Synonyms |

Foolhardy is a synonym of precipitate.


As adjectives the difference between foolhardy and precipitate

is that foolhardy is marked by unthinking recklessness with disregard for danger; bold but rash; hotheaded while precipitate is headlong; falling steeply or vertically.

As a verb precipitate is

to make something happen suddenly and quickly; hasten.

As a noun precipitate is

a product resulting from a process, event, or course of action.

Overtake vs Precipitate - What's the difference?

overtake | precipitate |


As verbs the difference between overtake and precipitate

is that overtake is to pass a more slowly moving object while precipitate is to make something happen suddenly and quickly; hasten.

As a noun precipitate is

a product resulting from a process, event, or course of action.

As an adjective precipitate is

headlong; falling steeply or vertically.

Precipitate vs Dispatch - What's the difference?

precipitate | dispatch |


As verbs the difference between precipitate and dispatch

is that precipitate is to make something happen suddenly and quickly; hasten while dispatch is to send a shipment with promptness.

As nouns the difference between precipitate and dispatch

is that precipitate is a product resulting from a process, event, or course of action while dispatch is a message sent quickly, as a shipment, a prompt settlement of a business, or an important official message sent by a diplomat, or military officer.

As an adjective precipitate

is headlong; falling steeply or vertically.

Severe vs Precipitate - What's the difference?

severe | precipitate | Related terms |

Severe is a related term of precipitate.


As adjectives the difference between severe and precipitate

is that severe is severe, harsh while precipitate is headlong; falling steeply or vertically.

As a verb precipitate is

to make something happen suddenly and quickly; hasten.

As a noun precipitate is

a product resulting from a process, event, or course of action.

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