plough

Constellation vs Plough - What's the difference?

constellation | plough |


As nouns the difference between constellation and plough

is that constellation is an arbitrary formation of stars perceived as a figure or pattern while plough is a device pulled through the ground in order to break it open into furrows for planting.

As a verb plough is

to use a plough on to prepare for planting.

Wain vs Plough - What's the difference?

wain | plough |

Wain is a synonym of plough.


As nouns the difference between wain and plough

is that wain is (archaic|or|literary) a wagon; a four-wheeled cart for hauling loads, usually pulled by horses or oxen while plough is a device pulled through the ground in order to break it open into furrows for planting.

As verbs the difference between wain and plough

is that wain is while plough is to use a plough on to prepare for planting.

Star vs Plough - What's the difference?

star | plough |


As nouns the difference between star and plough

is that star is any small luminous dot appearing in the cloudless portion of the night sky, especially with a fixed location relative to other such dots while plough is a device pulled through the ground in order to break it open into furrows for planting.

As verbs the difference between star and plough

is that star is to appear as a featured performer or headliner, especially in an entertainment program while plough is to use a plough on to prepare for planting.

Plough vs Rafter - What's the difference?

plough | rafter |


As nouns the difference between plough and rafter

is that plough is a device pulled through the ground in order to break it open into furrows for planting while rafter is one of a series of sloped beams that extend from the ridge or hip to the downslope perimeter or eave, designed to support the roof deck and its associated loads or rafter can be a raftsman.

As verbs the difference between plough and rafter

is that plough is to use a plough on to prepare for planting while rafter is to make (timber, etc) into rafters.

Plough vs Ard - What's the difference?

plough | ard |


As nouns the difference between plough and ard

is that plough is a device pulled through the ground in order to break it open into furrows for planting while ard is a simple plough consisting of a spike dragged through the soil.

As a verb plough

is to use a plough on to prepare for planting.

Plough vs Arable - What's the difference?

plough | arable |


As a noun plough

is a device pulled through the ground in order to break it open into furrows for planting.

As a verb plough

is to use a plough on to prepare for planting.

As a adjective arable is

able to be plowed or tilled, capable of growing crops (traditionally contrasted with (pasturable) lands such as heaths).

Plough vs Rove - What's the difference?

plough | rove |


As nouns the difference between plough and rove

is that plough is a device pulled through the ground in order to break it open into furrows for planting while rove is a copper washer upon which the end of a nail is clinched in boatbuilding.

As verbs the difference between plough and rove

is that plough is to use a plough on to prepare for planting while rove is (obsolete|intransitive) to shoot with arrows (at) or rove can be (rive).

Plough vs Hake - What's the difference?

plough | hake |


As nouns the difference between plough and hake

is that plough is a device pulled through the ground in order to break it open into furrows for planting while hake is a hook; a pot-hook or hake can be one of several species of marine gadoid fishes, of the genera (taxlink), (taxlink), and allies or hake can be a drying shed, as for unburned tile.

As verbs the difference between plough and hake

is that plough is to use a plough on to prepare for planting while hake is (uk|dialect) to loiter; to sneak.

Plough vs Earing - What's the difference?

plough | earing |


As nouns the difference between plough and earing

is that plough is a device pulled through the ground in order to break it open into furrows for planting while earing is (nautical) a line used to fasten the upper corners of a sail to the yard or gaff; also called head earing.

As a verb plough

is to use a plough on to prepare for planting.

Yoke vs Plough - What's the difference?

yoke | plough |

Yoke is a see also of plough.


As nouns the difference between yoke and plough

is that yoke is a bar or frame of wood by which two oxen are joined at the heads or necks for working together while plough is a device pulled through the ground in order to break it open into furrows for planting.

As verbs the difference between yoke and plough

is that yoke is to link or to join while plough is to use a plough on to prepare for planting.

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