phocomelia

Phocomelia vs Amelia - What's the difference?

phocomelia | amelia |


As nouns the difference between phocomelia and amelia

is that phocomelia is a congenital disorder of the limbs, the affected person being born with abnormally short or missing bones and flipper-like hands or feet while amelia is (pathology) the congenital absence of one or more limbs.

Phocomeli vs Phocomelia - What's the difference?

phocomeli | phocomelia |


As nouns the difference between phocomeli and phocomelia

is that phocomeli is while phocomelia is a congenital disorder of the limbs, the affected person being born with abnormally short or missing bones and flipper-like hands or feet.

Dysmelia vs Phocomelia - What's the difference?

dysmelia | phocomelia | Hypernyms |

Dysmelia is a hypernym of phocomelia.


As nouns the difference between dysmelia and phocomelia

is that dysmelia is any congenital disorder of the limbs, such as amelia or syndactyly while phocomelia is a congenital disorder of the limbs, the affected person being born with abnormally short or missing bones and flipper-like hands or feet.

Phocomelus vs Phocomelia - What's the difference?

phocomelus | phocomelia | Related terms |

Phocomelus is a related term of phocomelia.


As nouns the difference between phocomelus and phocomelia

is that phocomelus is (dated) phocomelia while phocomelia is a congenital disorder of the limbs, the affected person being born with abnormally short or missing bones and flipper-like hands or feet.

Flipper vs Phocomelia - What's the difference?

flipper | phocomelia |


As a proper noun flipper

is a common name for animals which have flippers, such as dolphins and seals.

As a noun phocomelia is

a congenital disorder of the limbs, the affected person being born with abnormally short or missing bones and flipper-like hands or feet.

Bone vs Phocomelia - What's the difference?

bone | phocomelia |


As a proper noun bone

is (historical) a city in eastern algeria, now known as annaba.

As a noun phocomelia is

a congenital disorder of the limbs, the affected person being born with abnormally short or missing bones and flipper-like hands or feet.

Limb vs Phocomelia - What's the difference?

limb | phocomelia |


As nouns the difference between limb and phocomelia

is that limb is a major appendage of human or animal, used for locomotion (such as an arm, leg or wing) or limb can be (astronomy) the apparent visual edge of a celestial body while phocomelia is a congenital disorder of the limbs, the affected person being born with abnormally short or missing bones and flipper-like hands or feet.

As a verb limb

is to remove the limbs from an animal or tree.

Disorder vs Phocomelia - What's the difference?

disorder | phocomelia |


As nouns the difference between disorder and phocomelia

is that disorder is absence of order; state of not being arranged in an orderly manner while phocomelia is a congenital disorder of the limbs, the affected person being born with abnormally short or missing bones and flipper-like hands or feet.

Congenital vs Phocomelia - What's the difference?

congenital | phocomelia |


As an adjective congenital

is congenital: originating before birth and continuing or progressing thereafter.

As a noun phocomelia is

a congenital disorder of the limbs, the affected person being born with abnormally short or missing bones and flipper-like hands or feet.

Phocomelia vs Thalidomide - What's the difference?

phocomelia | thalidomide |


As nouns the difference between phocomelia and thalidomide

is that phocomelia is a congenital disorder of the limbs, the affected person being born with abnormally short or missing bones and flipper-like hands or feet while thalidomide is (pharmaceutical drug) oxopiperidin-3-yl)-1h-isoindole-1,3(2h)dione c13h10n2[[oxygen|o4 — a drug that was sold during the late 1950s and 1960s as a sleeping aid, and to pregnant women as an antiemetic to combat morning sickness and other symptoms, but was withdrawn after being proven to cause severe birth defects, such as phocomelia; currently used to treat leprosy.