off

Pieces vs Off - What's the difference?

pieces | off |


As a noun pieces

is .

As an adverb off is

in a direction away from the speaker or object.

As an adjective off is

inoperative, disabled.

As a preposition off is

(used to indicate movement away from a position on).

As a verb off is

(slang) to kill.

Block vs Off - What's the difference?

block | off |


As a noun block

is bloc.

As an adverb off is

in a direction away from the speaker or object.

As an adjective off is

inoperative, disabled.

As a preposition off is

(used to indicate movement away from a position on).

As a verb off is

(slang) to kill.

Outside vs Off - What's the difference?

outside | off |


As a proper noun outside

is (slang|us) to residents of alaska, the rest of the united states, especially the contiguous 48 states south of canada.

As an adverb off is

in a direction away from the speaker or object.

As an adjective off is

inoperative, disabled.

As a preposition off is

(used to indicate movement away from a position on).

As a verb off is

(slang) to kill.

Off vs Trip - What's the difference?

off | trip |


As an adverb off

is in a direction away from the speaker or object.

As an adjective off

is inoperative, disabled.

As a preposition off

is (used to indicate movement away from a position on).

As a verb off

is (slang) to kill.

As a noun trip is

trip.

Off vs With - What's the difference?

off | with |


As adverbs the difference between off and with

is that off is in a direction away from the speaker or object while with is (midwestern us) along, together with others/group etc.

As prepositions the difference between off and with

is that off is (used to indicate movement away from a position on) while with is against.

As an adjective off

is inoperative, disabled.

As a verb off

is (slang) to kill.

As a noun with is

.

Off vs Near - What's the difference?

off | near |


In colloquial|lang=en terms the difference between off and near

is that off is (colloquial) out of the possession of while near is (colloquial) nearly.

As adverbs the difference between off and near

is that off is in a direction away from the speaker or object while near is having a small intervening distance with regard to something.

As adjectives the difference between off and near

is that off is inoperative, disabled while near is physically close.

As prepositions the difference between off and near

is that off is (used to indicate movement away from a position on) while near is close to, in close proximity to.

As verbs the difference between off and near

is that off is (slang) to kill while near is to come closer to; to approach.

As a noun near is

the left side of a horse or of a team of horses pulling a carriage etc.

Off vs Stop - What's the difference?

off | stop |


As an adverb off

is in a direction away from the speaker or object.

As an adjective off

is inoperative, disabled.

As a preposition off

is (used to indicate movement away from a position on).

As a verb off

is (slang) to kill.

As a noun stop is

.

Off vs Promotion - What's the difference?

off | promotion |


As an adverb off

is in a direction away from the speaker or object.

As an adjective off

is inoperative, disabled.

As a preposition off

is (used to indicate movement away from a position on).

As a verb off

is (slang) to kill.

As a noun promotion is

granting of a doctorate,.

Behind vs Off - What's the difference?

behind | off |


As prepositions the difference between behind and off

is that behind is at the back of while off is (used to indicate movement away from a position on).

As adverbs the difference between behind and off

is that behind is at the back part; in the rear while off is in a direction away from the speaker or object.

As a noun behind

is the rear, back-end.

As an adjective off is

inoperative, disabled.

As a verb off is

(slang) to kill.

Nag vs Off - What's the difference?

nag | off |


As verbs the difference between nag and off

is that nag is to repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters while off is (slang) to kill.

As a noun nag

is a small horse; a pony or nag can be one who.

As an adverb off is

in a direction away from the speaker or object.

As an adjective off is

inoperative, disabled.

As a preposition off is

(used to indicate movement away from a position on).

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