nag

Nag vs Beg - What's the difference?

nag | beg |


As nouns the difference between nag and beg

is that nag is a small horse; a pony or nag can be one who while beg is .

As a verb nag

is to repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters.

Snarl vs Nag - What's the difference?

snarl | nag |


As nouns the difference between snarl and nag

is that snarl is a knot or complication of hair, thread, or the like, difficult to disentangle; entanglement; hence, intricate complication; embarrassing difficulty while nag is a small horse; a pony or nag can be one who.

As verbs the difference between snarl and nag

is that snarl is to form raised work upon the outer surface of (thin metal ware) by the repercussion of a snarling iron upon the inner surface while nag is to repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters.

Nag vs Jangle - What's the difference?

nag | jangle |


As nouns the difference between nag and jangle

is that nag is a small horse; a pony or nag can be one who while jangle is a rattling metallic sound.

As verbs the difference between nag and jangle

is that nag is to repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters while jangle is to make a rattling metallic sound.

Nag vs Harp - What's the difference?

nag | harp |


As a noun nag

is a small horse; a pony or nag can be one who.

As a verb nag

is to repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters.

As a proper noun harp is

for a player of the harp.

Nag vs Obnoxious - What's the difference?

nag | obnoxious |


As a noun nag

is or nag can be .

As a verb nag

is .

As an adjective obnoxious is

.

Niggle vs Nag - What's the difference?

niggle | nag |


As nouns the difference between niggle and nag

is that niggle is a minor complaint or problem while nag is a small horse; a pony or nag can be one who.

As verbs the difference between niggle and nag

is that niggle is to trifle with; to deceive; to mock while nag is to repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters.

Nag vs Rail - What's the difference?

nag | rail |


As nouns the difference between nag and rail

is that nag is a small horse; a pony or nag can be one who while rail is a horizontal bar extending between supports and used for support or as a barrier; a railing or rail can be any of several birds in the family rallidae or rail can be (obsolete) an item of clothing; a cloak or other garment; a dress.

As verbs the difference between nag and rail

is that nag is to repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters while rail is to travel by railway or rail can be to complain violently ((against), (about)) or rail can be (label) to gush, flow (of liquid).

Wife vs Nag - What's the difference?

wife | nag |


As nouns the difference between wife and nag

is that wife is a married woman, especially in relation to her spouse while nag is a small horse; a pony or nag can be one who.

As a verb nag is

to repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters.

Nag vs Banter - What's the difference?

nag | banter |


As nouns the difference between nag and banter

is that nag is a small horse; a pony or nag can be one who while banter is good-humoured, playful, typically spontaneous conversation.

As verbs the difference between nag and banter

is that nag is to repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters while banter is to engage in banter or playful conversation.

Nag vs Off - What's the difference?

nag | off |


As verbs the difference between nag and off

is that nag is to repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters while off is (slang) to kill.

As a noun nag

is a small horse; a pony or nag can be one who.

As an adverb off is

in a direction away from the speaker or object.

As an adjective off is

inoperative, disabled.

As a preposition off is

(used to indicate movement away from a position on).

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