mortgage

Substitute vs Mortgage - What's the difference?

substitute | mortgage |


As verbs the difference between substitute and mortgage

is that substitute is to use in place of something else, with the same function while mortgage is (legal) to borrow against a property, to obtain a loan for another purpose by giving away the right of seizure to the lender over a fixed property such as a house or piece of land; to pledge a property in order to get a loan.

As nouns the difference between substitute and mortgage

is that substitute is a replacement or stand-in for something that achieves a similar result or purpose while mortgage is (legal) a special form of secured loan where the purpose of the loan must be specified to the lender, to purchase assets that must be fixed (not movable) property such as a house or piece of farm land the assets are registered as the legal property of the borrower but the lender can seize them and dispose of them if they are not satisfied with the manner in which the repayment of the loan is conducted by the borrower once the loan is fully repaid, the lender loses this right of seizure and the assets are then deemed to be unencumbered.

Mortgage vs Stock - What's the difference?

mortgage | stock |


As nouns the difference between mortgage and stock

is that mortgage is (legal) a special form of secured loan where the purpose of the loan must be specified to the lender, to purchase assets that must be fixed (not movable) property such as a house or piece of farm land the assets are registered as the legal property of the borrower but the lender can seize them and dispose of them if they are not satisfied with the manner in which the repayment of the loan is conducted by the borrower once the loan is fully repaid, the lender loses this right of seizure and the assets are then deemed to be unencumbered while stock is stick, staff.

As a verb mortgage

is (legal) to borrow against a property, to obtain a loan for another purpose by giving away the right of seizure to the lender over a fixed property such as a house or piece of land; to pledge a property in order to get a loan.

As a prefix stock is

used to emphasize.

Mortgage vs Amortization - What's the difference?

mortgage | amortization |


As nouns the difference between mortgage and amortization

is that mortgage is (legal) a special form of secured loan where the purpose of the loan must be specified to the lender, to purchase assets that must be fixed (not movable) property such as a house or piece of farm land the assets are registered as the legal property of the borrower but the lender can seize them and dispose of them if they are not satisfied with the manner in which the repayment of the loan is conducted by the borrower once the loan is fully repaid, the lender loses this right of seizure and the assets are then deemed to be unencumbered while amortization is the reduction of loan principal over a series of payments.

As a verb mortgage

is (legal) to borrow against a property, to obtain a loan for another purpose by giving away the right of seizure to the lender over a fixed property such as a house or piece of land; to pledge a property in order to get a loan.

Caveat vs Mortgage - What's the difference?

caveat | mortgage |


In legal|lang=en terms the difference between caveat and mortgage

is that caveat is (legal) to lodge a formal notice of interest in land, under a while mortgage is (legal) to borrow against a property, to obtain a loan for another purpose by giving away the right of seizure to the lender over a fixed property such as a house or piece of land; to pledge a property in order to get a loan.

In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between caveat and mortgage

is that caveat is (obsolete) to warn or caution against some event while mortgage is (obsolete) state of being pledged.

As nouns the difference between caveat and mortgage

is that caveat is a warning while mortgage is (legal) a special form of secured loan where the purpose of the loan must be specified to the lender, to purchase assets that must be fixed (not movable) property such as a house or piece of farm land the assets are registered as the legal property of the borrower but the lender can seize them and dispose of them if they are not satisfied with the manner in which the repayment of the loan is conducted by the borrower once the loan is fully repaid, the lender loses this right of seizure and the assets are then deemed to be unencumbered.

As verbs the difference between caveat and mortgage

is that caveat is to qualify a particular statement with a proviso or while mortgage is (legal) to borrow against a property, to obtain a loan for another purpose by giving away the right of seizure to the lender over a fixed property such as a house or piece of land; to pledge a property in order to get a loan.

Mortgage vs Securities - What's the difference?

mortgage | securities |


As nouns the difference between mortgage and securities

is that mortgage is (legal) a special form of secured loan where the purpose of the loan must be specified to the lender, to purchase assets that must be fixed (not movable) property such as a house or piece of farm land the assets are registered as the legal property of the borrower but the lender can seize them and dispose of them if they are not satisfied with the manner in which the repayment of the loan is conducted by the borrower once the loan is fully repaid, the lender loses this right of seizure and the assets are then deemed to be unencumbered while securities is .

As a verb mortgage

is (legal) to borrow against a property, to obtain a loan for another purpose by giving away the right of seizure to the lender over a fixed property such as a house or piece of land; to pledge a property in order to get a loan.

Fish vs Mortgage - What's the difference?

fish | mortgage |


As a proper noun fish

is .

As a noun mortgage is

(legal) a special form of secured loan where the purpose of the loan must be specified to the lender, to purchase assets that must be fixed (not movable) property such as a house or piece of farm land the assets are registered as the legal property of the borrower but the lender can seize them and dispose of them if they are not satisfied with the manner in which the repayment of the loan is conducted by the borrower once the loan is fully repaid, the lender loses this right of seizure and the assets are then deemed to be unencumbered.

As a verb mortgage is

(legal) to borrow against a property, to obtain a loan for another purpose by giving away the right of seizure to the lender over a fixed property such as a house or piece of land; to pledge a property in order to get a loan.

Leverage vs Mortgage - What's the difference?

leverage | mortgage |


As nouns the difference between leverage and mortgage

is that leverage is a force compounded by means of a lever rotating around a pivot; see torque while mortgage is (legal) a special form of secured loan where the purpose of the loan must be specified to the lender, to purchase assets that must be fixed (not movable) property such as a house or piece of farm land the assets are registered as the legal property of the borrower but the lender can seize them and dispose of them if they are not satisfied with the manner in which the repayment of the loan is conducted by the borrower once the loan is fully repaid, the lender loses this right of seizure and the assets are then deemed to be unencumbered.

As verbs the difference between leverage and mortgage

is that leverage is (transitive|chiefly|us|slang|business) to use; to exploit; to take full advantage (of something) while mortgage is (legal) to borrow against a property, to obtain a loan for another purpose by giving away the right of seizure to the lender over a fixed property such as a house or piece of land; to pledge a property in order to get a loan.

Hock vs Mortgage - What's the difference?

hock | mortgage |


As nouns the difference between hock and mortgage

is that hock is a rhenish wine, of a light yellow color, either sparkling or still, from the hochheim region, but often applied to all rhenish wines or hock can be the tarsal joint of a digitigrade quadruped, such as a horse, pig or dog or hock can be , obligation as collateral for a loan while mortgage is (legal) a special form of secured loan where the purpose of the loan must be specified to the lender, to purchase assets that must be fixed (not movable) property such as a house or piece of farm land the assets are registered as the legal property of the borrower but the lender can seize them and dispose of them if they are not satisfied with the manner in which the repayment of the loan is conducted by the borrower once the loan is fully repaid, the lender loses this right of seizure and the assets are then deemed to be unencumbered.

As verbs the difference between hock and mortgage

is that hock is to disable by cutting the tendons of the hock; to hamstring; to hough or hock can be (senseid)(colloquial) to leave with a pawnbroker as security for a loan or hock can be (us) to bother; to pester; to annoy incessantly while mortgage is (legal) to borrow against a property, to obtain a loan for another purpose by giving away the right of seizure to the lender over a fixed property such as a house or piece of land; to pledge a property in order to get a loan.

Encumbered vs Mortgage - What's the difference?

encumbered | mortgage |


As verbs the difference between encumbered and mortgage

is that encumbered is (encumber) while mortgage is (legal) to borrow against a property, to obtain a loan for another purpose by giving away the right of seizure to the lender over a fixed property such as a house or piece of land; to pledge a property in order to get a loan.

As an adjective encumbered

is weighted down, loaded sufficiently to make slow.

As a noun mortgage is

(legal) a special form of secured loan where the purpose of the loan must be specified to the lender, to purchase assets that must be fixed (not movable) property such as a house or piece of farm land the assets are registered as the legal property of the borrower but the lender can seize them and dispose of them if they are not satisfied with the manner in which the repayment of the loan is conducted by the borrower once the loan is fully repaid, the lender loses this right of seizure and the assets are then deemed to be unencumbered.

Contract vs Mortgage - What's the difference?

contract | mortgage |


In legal|lang=en terms the difference between contract and mortgage

is that contract is (legal) a part of legal studies dealing with laws and jurisdiction related to contracts while mortgage is (legal) to borrow against a property, to obtain a loan for another purpose by giving away the right of seizure to the lender over a fixed property such as a house or piece of land; to pledge a property in order to get a loan.

In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between contract and mortgage

is that contract is (obsolete) not abstract; concrete while mortgage is (obsolete) state of being pledged.

As nouns the difference between contract and mortgage

is that contract is an agreement between two or more parties, to perform a specific job or work order, often temporary or of fixed duration and usually governed by a written agreement while mortgage is (legal) a special form of secured loan where the purpose of the loan must be specified to the lender, to purchase assets that must be fixed (not movable) property such as a house or piece of farm land the assets are registered as the legal property of the borrower but the lender can seize them and dispose of them if they are not satisfied with the manner in which the repayment of the loan is conducted by the borrower once the loan is fully repaid, the lender loses this right of seizure and the assets are then deemed to be unencumbered.

As verbs the difference between contract and mortgage

is that contract is (ambitransitive) to draw together or nearer; to shorten, narrow, or lessen while mortgage is (legal) to borrow against a property, to obtain a loan for another purpose by giving away the right of seizure to the lender over a fixed property such as a house or piece of land; to pledge a property in order to get a loan.

As an adjective contract

is (obsolete) contracted; affianced; betrothed.

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