meander

Meander vs Drift - What's the difference?

meander | drift |


As verbs the difference between meander and drift

is that meander is to wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate while drift is drifting.

As a noun meander

is a winding, crooked, or involved course.

Meander vs Mosey - What's the difference?

meander | mosey |


As verbs the difference between meander and mosey

is that meander is to wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate while mosey is (chiefly|us|dialectal) to set off, get going; to start a journey.

As a noun meander

is a winding, crooked, or involved course.

Trot vs Meander - What's the difference?

trot | meander | Related terms |

Trot is a related term of meander.


As nouns the difference between trot and meander

is that trot is trotskyist while meander is a winding, crooked, or involved course.

As a verb meander is

to wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate.

Jog vs Meander - What's the difference?

jog | meander | Related terms |

Jog is a related term of meander.


As nouns the difference between jog and meander

is that jog is a form of exercise, slower than a run; an energetic trot while meander is a winding, crooked, or involved course.

As verbs the difference between jog and meander

is that jog is to push slightly; to move or shake with a push or jerk, as to gain the attention of; to jolt while meander is to wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate.

Scurry vs Meander - What's the difference?

scurry | meander | Related terms |

Scurry is a related term of meander.


As verbs the difference between scurry and meander

is that scurry is to run away with quick light steps, to scamper while meander is to wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate.

As a noun meander is

a winding, crooked, or involved course.

Slouch vs Meander - What's the difference?

slouch | meander | Related terms |

Slouch is a related term of meander.


In lang=en terms the difference between slouch and meander

is that slouch is to walk in a clumsy, lazy manner while meander is to wind, turn, or twist; to make flexuous.

As nouns the difference between slouch and meander

is that slouch is a hanging down of the head; a drooping posture; a limp appearance while meander is a winding, crooked, or involved course.

As verbs the difference between slouch and meander

is that slouch is to hang or droop; to adopt a limp posture while meander is to wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate.

Journey vs Meander - What's the difference?

journey | meander | Related terms |

Journey is a related term of meander.


As nouns the difference between journey and meander

is that journey is a set amount of travelling, seen as a single unit; a discrete trip, a voyage while meander is a winding, crooked, or involved course.

As verbs the difference between journey and meander

is that journey is to travel, to make a trip or voyage while meander is to wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate.

High-tail vs Meander - What's the difference?

high-tail | meander | Related terms |

High-tail is a related term of meander.


As a noun meander is

a winding, crooked, or involved course.

As a verb meander is

to wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate.

Slither vs Meander - What's the difference?

slither | meander | Related terms |

Slither is a related term of meander.


In lang=en terms the difference between slither and meander

is that slither is to slide while meander is to wind, turn, or twist; to make flexuous.

As verbs the difference between slither and meander

is that slither is to move about smoothly and from side to side while meander is to wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate.

As a noun meander is

a winding, crooked, or involved course.

Gallop vs Meander - What's the difference?

gallop | meander | Related terms |

Gallop is a related term of meander.


As nouns the difference between gallop and meander

is that gallop is the fastest gait of a horse, a two-beat stride during which all four legs are off the ground simultaneously while meander is a winding, crooked, or involved course.

As verbs the difference between gallop and meander

is that gallop is (intransitive of a horse, etc) to run at a gallop while meander is to wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate.

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