lumber

Slouch vs Lumber - What's the difference?

slouch | lumber |


In lang=en terms the difference between slouch and lumber

is that slouch is to walk in a clumsy, lazy manner while lumber is to load down with things, to fill, to encumber.

As nouns the difference between slouch and lumber

is that slouch is a hanging down of the head; a drooping posture; a limp appearance while lumber is (uncountable) wood intended as a building material.

As verbs the difference between slouch and lumber

is that slouch is to hang or droop; to adopt a limp posture while lumber is to move clumsily.

Lumber vs Breeze - What's the difference?

lumber | breeze | Related terms |

Lumber is a related term of breeze.


In lang=en terms the difference between lumber and breeze

is that lumber is to load down with things, to fill, to encumber while breeze is to buzz.

As nouns the difference between lumber and breeze

is that lumber is (uncountable) wood intended as a building material while breeze is a gadfly; a horsefly or breeze can be a light, gentle wind.

As verbs the difference between lumber and breeze

is that lumber is to move clumsily while breeze is to buzz or breeze can be to move casually, in a carefree manner.

Lumber vs Meander - What's the difference?

lumber | meander | Related terms |

Lumber is a related term of meander.


In lang=en terms the difference between lumber and meander

is that lumber is to load down with things, to fill, to encumber while meander is to wind, turn, or twist; to make flexuous.

As nouns the difference between lumber and meander

is that lumber is (uncountable) wood intended as a building material while meander is a winding, crooked, or involved course.

As verbs the difference between lumber and meander

is that lumber is to move clumsily while meander is to wind or turn in a course or passage; to be intricate.

Lumber vs Straggle - What's the difference?

lumber | straggle | Related terms |

Lumber is a related term of straggle.


As nouns the difference between lumber and straggle

is that lumber is (uncountable) wood intended as a building material while straggle is the act of straggling.

As verbs the difference between lumber and straggle

is that lumber is to move clumsily while straggle is to stray from the road, course or line of march.

Limp vs Lumber - What's the difference?

limp | lumber |


In lang=en terms the difference between limp and lumber

is that limp is to walk lamely, as if favouring one leg while lumber is to load down with things, to fill, to encumber.

As verbs the difference between limp and lumber

is that limp is to happen; befall; chance or limp can be to be inadequate or unsatisfactory or limp can be to walk lamely, as if favouring one leg while lumber is to move clumsily.

As nouns the difference between limp and lumber

is that limp is a scraper of board or sheet-iron shaped like half the head of a small cask, used for scraping the ore off the sieve in the operation of hand-jigging or limp can be an irregular, jerky or awkward gait while lumber is (uncountable) wood intended as a building material.

As an adjective limp

is flaccid; flabby, as flesh.

Lumber vs Hurry - What's the difference?

lumber | hurry | Related terms |

Lumber is a related term of hurry.


As nouns the difference between lumber and hurry

is that lumber is (uncountable) wood intended as a building material while hurry is rushed action.

As verbs the difference between lumber and hurry

is that lumber is to move clumsily while hurry is (label) to do things quickly.

Lumber vs Race - What's the difference?

lumber | race | Related terms |

Lumber is a related term of race.


As verbs the difference between lumber and race

is that lumber is to move clumsily while race is .

As a noun lumber

is (uncountable) wood intended as a building material.

As an adjective race is

distinguished; classy.

Lumber vs Dash - What's the difference?

lumber | dash | Related terms |

Lumber is a related term of dash.


In lang=en terms the difference between lumber and dash

is that lumber is to load down with things, to fill, to encumber while dash is to complete hastily, usually with down'' or ''off .

As nouns the difference between lumber and dash

is that lumber is (uncountable) wood intended as a building material while dash is (typography) any of the following symbols: (''horizontal bar ).

As verbs the difference between lumber and dash

is that lumber is to move clumsily while dash is to run quickly or for a short distance.

As an interjection dash is

(euphemistic) damn!.

Lumber vs Scamper - What's the difference?

lumber | scamper | Related terms |

Lumber is a related term of scamper.


In lang=en terms the difference between lumber and scamper

is that lumber is to load down with things, to fill, to encumber while scamper is to run quickly and lightly, especially in a playful manner or in an undignified manner.

As nouns the difference between lumber and scamper

is that lumber is (uncountable) wood intended as a building material while scamper is a quick, light run.

As verbs the difference between lumber and scamper

is that lumber is to move clumsily while scamper is to run quickly and lightly, especially in a playful manner or in an undignified manner.

Lumber vs Bound - What's the difference?

lumber | bound | Related terms |

Lumber is a related term of bound.


In lang=en terms the difference between lumber and bound

is that lumber is to load down with things, to fill, to encumber while bound is to cause to leap.

As nouns the difference between lumber and bound

is that lumber is (uncountable) wood intended as a building material while bound is (often|used in plural) a boundary, the border which one must cross in order to enter or leave a territory or bound can be a sizeable jump, great leap.

As verbs the difference between lumber and bound

is that lumber is to move clumsily while bound is (bind) or bound can be to surround a territory or other geographical entity or bound can be to leap, move by jumping.

As an adjective bound is

(with infinitive) obliged (to) or bound can be (obsolete) ready, prepared.

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