velvet

Velvet vs Flocking - What's the difference?

velvet | flocking |


As nouns the difference between velvet and flocking

is that velvet is a closely woven fabric (originally of silk, now also of cotton or man-made fibres) with a thick short pile on one side while flocking is the process of adding small particles to a surface for the sake of texture.

As verbs the difference between velvet and flocking

is that velvet is (cooking) to coat raw meat in starch, then in oil, preparatory to frying while flocking is .

As an adjective velvet

is made of velvet.

Violet vs Velvet - What's the difference?

violet | velvet |


As a proper noun violet

is .

As a noun velvet is

a closely woven fabric (originally of silk, now also of cotton or man-made fibres) with a thick short pile on one side.

As a verb velvet is

(cooking) to coat raw meat in starch, then in oil, preparatory to frying.

As an adjective velvet is

made of velvet.

Milkshake vs Velvet - What's the difference?

milkshake | velvet |


As nouns the difference between milkshake and velvet

is that milkshake is a thick beverage consisting of milk and ice cream mixed together, often with fruit, chocolate, or other flavoring while velvet is a closely woven fabric (originally of silk, now also of cotton or man-made fibres) with a thick short pile on one side.

As a verb velvet is

(cooking) to coat raw meat in starch, then in oil, preparatory to frying.

As an adjective velvet is

made of velvet.

Felt vs Velvet - What's the difference?

felt | velvet |


As verbs the difference between felt and velvet

is that felt is to fear something while velvet is (cooking) to coat raw meat in starch, then in oil, preparatory to frying.

As a noun velvet is

a closely woven fabric (originally of silk, now also of cotton or man-made fibres) with a thick short pile on one side.

As an adjective velvet is

made of velvet.

Shiny vs Velvet - What's the difference?

shiny | velvet |


As adjectives the difference between shiny and velvet

is that shiny is reflecting light while velvet is made of velvet.

As nouns the difference between shiny and velvet

is that shiny is (informal) anything shiny; a trinket while velvet is a closely woven fabric (originally of silk, now also of cotton or man-made fibres) with a thick short pile on one side.

As a verb velvet is

(cooking) to coat raw meat in starch, then in oil, preparatory to frying.

Velvet vs Velours - What's the difference?

velvet | velours |


As nouns the difference between velvet and velours

is that velvet is a closely woven fabric (originally of silk, now also of cotton or man-made fibres) with a thick short pile on one side while velours is velour.

As a verb velvet

is (cooking) to coat raw meat in starch, then in oil, preparatory to frying.

As an adjective velvet

is made of velvet.

Floppy vs Velvet - What's the difference?

floppy | velvet |


As adjectives the difference between floppy and velvet

is that floppy is limp, not hard, firm, or rigid; flexible while velvet is made of velvet.

As nouns the difference between floppy and velvet

is that floppy is (computing) a floppy disk while velvet is a closely woven fabric (originally of silk, now also of cotton or man-made fibres) with a thick short pile on one side.

As a verb velvet is

(cooking) to coat raw meat in starch, then in oil, preparatory to frying.

Silky vs Velvet - What's the difference?

silky | velvet |


As adjectives the difference between silky and velvet

is that silky is similar in appearance or texture (especially in softness and smoothness) to silk while velvet is made of velvet.

As a noun velvet is

a closely woven fabric (originally of silk, now also of cotton or man-made fibres) with a thick short pile on one side.

As a verb velvet is

(cooking) to coat raw meat in starch, then in oil, preparatory to frying.

Velvet - What does it mean?

velvet | |

Velvet vs Satinampflash - What's the difference?

velvet | satinampflash |

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