liquor

Liquor vs Hocus - What's the difference?

liquor | hocus |


As nouns the difference between liquor and hocus

is that liquor is (obsolete) a liquid while hocus is one who cheats or deceives.

As verbs the difference between liquor and hocus

is that liquor is to drink liquor, usually to excess while hocus is to play a trick on; hoax; cheat.

Liquor vs Lush - What's the difference?

liquor | lush |


In context|obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between liquor and lush

is that liquor is (obsolete) a drinkable liquid while lush is (obsolete) lax; slack; limp; flexible.

As nouns the difference between liquor and lush

is that liquor is (obsolete) a liquid while lush is (pejorative) drunkard, sot, alcoholic.

As verbs the difference between liquor and lush

is that liquor is to drink liquor, usually to excess while lush is to drink liquor to excess.

As a adjective lush is

(obsolete) lax; slack; limp; flexible.

Grease vs Liquor - What's the difference?

grease | liquor |


As nouns the difference between grease and liquor

is that grease is animal fat in a melted or soft state while liquor is (obsolete) a liquid.

As verbs the difference between grease and liquor

is that grease is to put grease or fat on something, especially in order to lubricate while liquor is to drink liquor, usually to excess.

Cause vs Liquor - What's the difference?

cause | liquor |


As nouns the difference between cause and liquor

is that cause is the source or reason of an event or action while liquor is (obsolete) a liquid.

As verbs the difference between cause and liquor

is that cause is to set off an event or action while liquor is to drink liquor, usually to excess.

Excess vs Liquor - What's the difference?

excess | liquor |


As nouns the difference between excess and liquor

is that excess is the state of surpassing or going beyond limits; the being of a measure beyond sufficiency, necessity, or duty; that which exceeds what is usual or proper; immoderateness; superfluity; superabundance; extravagance; as, an excess of provisions or of light while liquor is (obsolete) a liquid.

As a adjective excess

is more than is normal, necessary or specified.

As a verb liquor is

to drink liquor, usually to excess.

Liquidity vs Liquor - What's the difference?

liquidity | liquor | Related terms |

Liquor is a related term of liquidity.

Liquidity is a related term of liquor.


As nouns the difference between liquidity and liquor

is that liquidity is (uncountable) the state or property of being liquid while liquor is (obsolete) a liquid.

As a verb liquor is

to drink liquor, usually to excess.

Liquidizer vs Liquor - What's the difference?

liquidizer | liquor | Related terms |

Liquor is a related term of liquidizer.

Liquidizer is a related term of liquor.


As nouns the difference between liquidizer and liquor

is that liquidizer is (british) a machine to chop or puree food while liquor is (obsolete) a liquid.

As a verb liquor is

to drink liquor, usually to excess.

Liquidator vs Liquor - What's the difference?

liquidator | liquor | Related terms |

Liquor is a related term of liquidator.

Liquidator is a related term of liquor.


As nouns the difference between liquidator and liquor

is that liquidator is one who liquidates while liquor is (obsolete) a liquid.

As a verb liquor is

to drink liquor, usually to excess.

Liquidation vs Liquor - What's the difference?

liquidation | liquor | Related terms |

Liquor is a related term of liquidation.

Liquidation is a related term of liquor.


As nouns the difference between liquidation and liquor

is that liquidation is the act of exchange of an asset of lesser liquidity with a more liquid one, such as cash while liquor is (obsolete) a liquid.

As a verb liquor is

to drink liquor, usually to excess.

Liquidate vs Liquor - What's the difference?

liquidate | liquor | Related terms |

Liquor is a related term of liquidate.

Liquidate is a related term of liquor.


In context|obsolete|transitive|lang=en terms the difference between liquidate and liquor

is that liquidate is (obsolete|transitive) to make liquid while liquor is (obsolete|transitive) to grease.

As verbs the difference between liquidate and liquor

is that liquidate is to settle (a debt) by paying the outstanding amount while liquor is to drink liquor, usually to excess.

As a noun liquor is

(obsolete) a liquid.

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