koto

Koto vs Harp - What's the difference?

koto | harp |


As a noun koto

is (musical instruments) a japanese stringed instrument having numerous strings, usually seven or thirteen, that are stretched over a convex wooden sounding board and are plucked with three plectra, worn on the thumb, index finger, and middle finger of one hand.

As a proper noun harp is

for a player of the harp.

Koto vs Kolo - What's the difference?

koto | kolo |


As nouns the difference between koto and kolo

is that koto is (musical instruments) a japanese stringed instrument having numerous strings, usually seven or thirteen, that are stretched over a convex wooden sounding board and are plucked with three plectra, worn on the thumb, index finger, and middle finger of one hand while kolo is a national folk dance common in regions pertaining to south slavic people, performed in a circle.

Koro vs Koto - What's the difference?

koro | koto |


As a proper noun koro

is an unwritten tibeto-burman language spoken in the east kameng district.

As a noun koto is

(musical instruments) a japanese stringed instrument having numerous strings, usually seven or thirteen, that are stretched over a convex wooden sounding board and are plucked with three plectra, worn on the thumb, index finger, and middle finger of one hand.

Koto vs Kobo - What's the difference?

koto | kobo |


As nouns the difference between koto and kobo

is that koto is (musical instruments) a japanese stringed instrument having numerous strings, usually seven or thirteen, that are stretched over a convex wooden sounding board and are plucked with three plectra, worn on the thumb, index finger, and middle finger of one hand while kobo is a subdivision of currency, equal to one hundredth of a nigerian naira.

Koto vs Keto - What's the difference?

koto | keto |


As nouns the difference between koto and keto

is that koto is (musical instruments) a japanese stringed instrument having numerous strings, usually seven or thirteen, that are stretched over a convex wooden sounding board and are plucked with three plectra, worn on the thumb, index finger, and middle finger of one hand while keto is (chemistry) the carbonyl group of a ketone.

As an adjective keto is

(informal) ketogenic.

Roto vs Koto - What's the difference?

roto | koto |


As a verb roto

is .

As a noun koto is

(musical instruments) a japanese stringed instrument having numerous strings, usually seven or thirteen, that are stretched over a convex wooden sounding board and are plucked with three plectra, worn on the thumb, index finger, and middle finger of one hand.

Koto vs Kotow - What's the difference?

koto | kotow |


As nouns the difference between koto and kotow

is that koto is (musical instruments) a japanese stringed instrument having numerous strings, usually seven or thirteen, that are stretched over a convex wooden sounding board and are plucked with three plectra, worn on the thumb, index finger, and middle finger of one hand while kotow is .

As a verb kotow is

.

Koto vs Boto - What's the difference?

koto | boto |


As a noun koto

is (musical instruments) a japanese stringed instrument having numerous strings, usually seven or thirteen, that are stretched over a convex wooden sounding board and are plucked with three plectra, worn on the thumb, index finger, and middle finger of one hand.

As a verb boto is

to be injured, wounded.

Koto vs Foto - What's the difference?

koto | foto |


As nouns the difference between koto and foto

is that koto is (musical instruments) a japanese stringed instrument having numerous strings, usually seven or thirteen, that are stretched over a convex wooden sounding board and are plucked with three plectra, worn on the thumb, index finger, and middle finger of one hand while foto is photon.

Goto vs Koto - What's the difference?

goto | koto |


As a verb goto

is .

As a noun koto is

(musical instruments) a japanese stringed instrument having numerous strings, usually seven or thirteen, that are stretched over a convex wooden sounding board and are plucked with three plectra, worn on the thumb, index finger, and middle finger of one hand.

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