intake

Intake vs Assessment - What's the difference?

intake | assessment |


As nouns the difference between intake and assessment

is that intake is the place where water or air is taken into a pipe or conduit; opposed to outlet while assessment is the act of assessing or an amount (of tax, levy or duty etc) assessed.

As a verb intake

is to take or draw in (in all the senses of the noun).

Intake vs Salary - What's the difference?

intake | salary |


As nouns the difference between intake and salary

is that intake is the place where water or air is taken into a pipe or conduit; opposed to outlet while salary is a fixed amount of money paid to a worker, usually measured on a monthly or annual basis, not hourly, as wages implies a degree of professionalism and/or autonomy.

As verbs the difference between intake and salary

is that intake is to take or draw in (in all the senses of the noun) while salary is to pay on the basis of a period of a week or longer, especially to convert from another form of compensation.

As an adjective salary is

(obsolete) saline.

Onboarding vs Intake - What's the difference?

onboarding | intake |


As nouns the difference between onboarding and intake

is that onboarding is (business) the process of bringing a new employee on board, incorporating training and orientation while intake is the place where water or air is taken into a pipe or conduit; opposed to outlet.

As a verb intake is

to take or draw in (in all the senses of the noun).

Intake vs Recruit - What's the difference?

intake | recruit |


As nouns the difference between intake and recruit

is that intake is the place where water or air is taken into a pipe or conduit; opposed to outlet while recruit is a supply of anything wasted or exhausted; a reinforcement.

As verbs the difference between intake and recruit

is that intake is to take or draw in (in all the senses of the noun) while recruit is to enroll or enlist new members or potential employees on behalf of an employer, organization, sports team, military, etc.

Intake vs Recruitment - What's the difference?

intake | recruitment |


As nouns the difference between intake and recruitment

is that intake is the place where water or air is taken into a pipe or conduit; opposed to outlet while recruitment is the process or art of finding candidates for a post in an organization, or of recruits for the armed forces.

As a verb intake

is to take or draw in (in all the senses of the noun).

Intake vs Admit - What's the difference?

intake | admit |


As verbs the difference between intake and admit

is that intake is to take or draw in (in all the senses of the noun) while admit is .

As a noun intake

is the place where water or air is taken into a pipe or conduit; opposed to outlet.

Intake vs Untaken - What's the difference?

intake | untaken |


As a noun intake

is the place where water or air is taken into a pipe or conduit; opposed to outlet.

As a verb intake

is to take or draw in (in all the senses of the noun).

As an adjective untaken is

not taken.

Ingress vs Intake - What's the difference?

ingress | intake |


As a proper noun ingress

is .

As a noun intake is

the place where water or air is taken into a pipe or conduit; opposed to outlet.

As a verb intake is

to take or draw in (in all the senses of the noun).

Intake vs Withdrawal - What's the difference?

intake | withdrawal |


As nouns the difference between intake and withdrawal

is that intake is the place where water or air is taken into a pipe or conduit; opposed to outlet while withdrawal is receiving from someone's care what one has earlier entrusted to them usually refers to money.

As a verb intake

is to take or draw in (in all the senses of the noun).

Intake vs Enrollment - What's the difference?

intake | enrollment |


As nouns the difference between intake and enrollment

is that intake is the place where water or air is taken into a pipe or conduit; opposed to outlet while enrollment is the act of enrolling or the state of being enrolled.

As a verb intake

is to take or draw in (in all the senses of the noun).

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