injunctive

Injunctive - What does it mean?

injunctive | |

Injunctive vs Optative - What's the difference?

injunctive | optative |


As nouns the difference between injunctive and optative

is that injunctive is (linguistics|uncountable) a verbal mood in sanskrit characterized by secondary endings but no augment, and usually looked like an augmentless aorist or imperfect while optative is (grammar) a mood of verbs found in some languages (eg old prussian, ancient greek), used to express a wish english has no inflexional optative mood, but it has modal verbs like "might" and "may" that express possibility.

As adjectives the difference between injunctive and optative

is that injunctive is pertaining to the injunctive mood while optative is expressing a wish or a choice.

Injunction vs Injunctive - What's the difference?

injunction | injunctive |


As nouns the difference between injunction and injunctive

is that injunction is the act of enjoining; the act of directing, commanding, or prohibiting while injunctive is (linguistics|uncountable) a verbal mood in sanskrit characterized by secondary endings but no augment, and usually looked like an augmentless aorist or imperfect.

As an adjective injunctive is

pertaining to the injunctive mood.

Lexeme vs Injunctive - What's the difference?

lexeme | injunctive |


As nouns the difference between lexeme and injunctive

is that lexeme is (linguistics) roughly, the set of inflected forms taken by a single word, such as the lexeme run including as members "run" (lemma), "running" (inflected form), or "ran", and excluding "runner" (derived term) while injunctive is (linguistics|uncountable) a verbal mood in sanskrit characterized by secondary endings but no augment, and usually looked like an augmentless aorist or imperfect.

As an adjective injunctive is

pertaining to the injunctive mood.

Imperfect vs Injunctive - What's the difference?

imperfect | injunctive |


As adjectives the difference between imperfect and injunctive

is that imperfect is not perfect while injunctive is pertaining to the injunctive mood.

As nouns the difference between imperfect and injunctive

is that imperfect is something having a minor flaw while injunctive is (linguistics|uncountable) a verbal mood in sanskrit characterized by secondary endings but no augment, and usually looked like an augmentless aorist or imperfect.

Aorist vs Injunctive - What's the difference?

aorist | injunctive |


As nouns the difference between aorist and injunctive

is that aorist is (grammar) a verb in the aorist past, that is, in the past tense and the aorist aspect (the event described by the verb viewed as a completed whole) also called the perfective past the nearest equivalent in english is the simple past the term aorist is used particularly often for verbs in albanian, ancient and modern greek while injunctive is (linguistics|uncountable) a verbal mood in sanskrit characterized by secondary endings but no augment, and usually looked like an augmentless aorist or imperfect.

As adjectives the difference between aorist and injunctive

is that aorist is (grammar) of or pertaining to a verb in the aorist aspect while injunctive is pertaining to the injunctive mood.

Augment vs Injunctive - What's the difference?

augment | injunctive |


As nouns the difference between augment and injunctive

is that augment is (grammar) in some indo-european languages, a prefix e-'' (''a- in sanskrit) indicating a past tense of a verb while injunctive is (linguistics|uncountable) a verbal mood in sanskrit characterized by secondary endings but no augment, and usually looked like an augmentless aorist or imperfect.

As a verb augment

is to increase; to make larger or supplement.

As an adjective injunctive is

pertaining to the injunctive mood.

Sanskrit vs Injunctive - What's the difference?

sanskrit | injunctive |


As nouns the difference between sanskrit and injunctive

is that sanskrit is the sanskrit language while injunctive is (linguistics|uncountable) a verbal mood in sanskrit characterized by secondary endings but no augment, and usually looked like an augmentless aorist or imperfect.

As an adjective injunctive is

pertaining to the injunctive mood.

Mood vs Injunctive - What's the difference?

mood | injunctive |


As nouns the difference between mood and injunctive

is that mood is a mental or emotional state, composure or mood can be (grammar) a verb form that depends on how its containing clause relates to the speaker’s or writer’s wish, intent, or assertion about reality while injunctive is (linguistics|uncountable) a verbal mood in sanskrit characterized by secondary endings but no augment, and usually looked like an augmentless aorist or imperfect.

As an adjective injunctive is

pertaining to the injunctive mood.