inert

Inert vs Heavy - What's the difference?

inert | heavy | Related terms |

Inert is a related term of heavy.


As adjectives the difference between inert and heavy

is that inert is unable to move or act; inanimate while heavy is (of a physical object) having great weight or heavy can be having the heaves.

As nouns the difference between inert and heavy

is that inert is (chemistry) a substance that does not react chemically while heavy is a villain or bad guy; the one responsible for evil or aggressive acts.

As an adverb heavy is

heavily.

As a verb heavy is

to make heavier.

Noiseless vs Inert - What's the difference?

noiseless | inert | Related terms |

Noiseless is a related term of inert.


As adjectives the difference between noiseless and inert

is that noiseless is producing no noise; without noise while inert is unable to move or act; inanimate.

As a noun inert is

(chemistry) a substance that does not react chemically.

Inert vs Senseless - What's the difference?

inert | senseless | Synonyms |

Inert is a synonym of senseless.


As adjectives the difference between inert and senseless

is that inert is unable to move or act; inanimate while senseless is bereft of feeling or consciousness; deprived of sensation; unconscious; insensible.

As a noun inert

is (chemistry) a substance that does not react chemically.

Inert vs Soulless - What's the difference?

inert | soulless | Related terms |

Inert is a related term of soulless.


As adjectives the difference between inert and soulless

is that inert is unable to move or act; inanimate while soulless is insensitive or unfeeling; as if without a soul.

As a noun inert

is (chemistry) a substance that does not react chemically.

Debilitated vs Inert - What's the difference?

debilitated | inert | Related terms |

Debilitated is a related term of inert.


As adjectives the difference between debilitated and inert

is that debilitated is weakened while inert is unable to move or act; inanimate.

As a verb debilitated

is (debilitate).

As a noun inert is

(chemistry) a substance that does not react chemically.

Inert vs Unopposing - What's the difference?

inert | unopposing | Related terms |

Inert is a related term of unopposing.


As adjectives the difference between inert and unopposing

is that inert is unable to move or act; inanimate while unopposing is not offering opposition.

As a noun inert

is (chemistry) a substance that does not react chemically.

Inert vs Irresolute - What's the difference?

inert | irresolute | Synonyms |

Inert is a synonym of irresolute.


As adjectives the difference between inert and irresolute

is that inert is unable to move or act; inanimate while irresolute is undecided or unsure how to act.

As a noun inert

is (chemistry) a substance that does not react chemically.

Inert vs Frigid - What's the difference?

inert | frigid | Related terms |

Inert is a related term of frigid.


As adjectives the difference between inert and frigid

is that inert is unable to move or act; inanimate while frigid is very cold; lacking warmth; icy.

As a noun inert

is (chemistry) a substance that does not react chemically.

Inert vs Inert - What's the difference?

inert | inert | Related terms |

Inert is a related term of inert.


In chemistry|lang=en terms the difference between inert and inert

is that inert is (chemistry) a substance that does not react chemically while inert is (chemistry) a substance that does not react chemically.

As adjectives the difference between inert and inert

is that inert is unable to move or act; inanimate while inert is unable to move or act; inanimate.

As nouns the difference between inert and inert

is that inert is (chemistry) a substance that does not react chemically while inert is (chemistry) a substance that does not react chemically.

Doing vs Inert - What's the difference?

doing | inert |


As a verb doing

is (rare|chiefly|netherlands|nonstandard).

As an adjective inert is

unable to move or act; inanimate.

As a noun inert is

(chemistry) a substance that does not react chemically.

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