impel

Impel vs Mandate - What's the difference?

impel | mandate |


As verbs the difference between impel and mandate

is that impel is to urge a person; to press on; to incite to action or motion via intrinsic motivation (contrast with propel, to compel or drive extrinsically) while mandate is .

Dispel vs Impel - What's the difference?

dispel | impel |


As verbs the difference between dispel and impel

is that dispel is to drive away by scattering, or to cause to vanish; to clear away; to banish; to dissipate while impel is to urge a person; to press on; to incite to action or motion via intrinsic motivation (contrast with propel, to compel or drive extrinsically).

Hearten vs Impel - What's the difference?

hearten | impel | Related terms |

Hearten is a related term of impel.


As verbs the difference between hearten and impel

is that hearten is to give heart to; to encourage, urge on, cheer, give confidence to while impel is to urge a person; to press on; to incite to action or motion via intrinsic motivation (contrast with propel, to compel or drive extrinsically).

Affect vs Impel - What's the difference?

affect | impel | Related terms |

Affect is a related term of impel.


In lang=en terms the difference between affect and impel

is that affect is to make a show of; to put on a pretence of; to feign; to assume to make a false display of while impel is to drive forward; to propel an object.

As verbs the difference between affect and impel

is that affect is to influence or alter or affect can be (obsolete|transitive) to aim for, to try to obtain while impel is to urge a person; to press on; to incite to action or motion via intrinsic motivation (contrast with propel, to compel or drive extrinsically).

As a noun affect

is (obsolete) one's mood or inclination; mental state.

Impel vs Propose - What's the difference?

impel | propose | Related terms |

Impel is a related term of propose.


As verbs the difference between impel and propose

is that impel is to urge a person; to press on; to incite to action or motion via intrinsic motivation (contrast with propel, to compel or drive extrinsically) while propose is .

Impel vs Hustle - What's the difference?

impel | hustle |


In lang=en terms the difference between impel and hustle

is that impel is to drive forward; to propel an object while hustle is to bundle, to stow something quickly.

As verbs the difference between impel and hustle

is that impel is to urge a person; to press on; to incite to action or motion via intrinsic motivation (contrast with propel, to compel or drive extrinsically) while hustle is to rush or hurry.

As a noun hustle is

a state of busy activity.

Impel vs Implore - What's the difference?

impel | implore |


As verbs the difference between impel and implore

is that impel is to urge a person; to press on; to incite to action or motion via intrinsic motivation (contrast with propel, to compel or drive extrinsically) while implore is .

Encourage vs Impel - What's the difference?

encourage | impel | Related terms |

Encourage is a related term of impel.


As verbs the difference between encourage and impel

is that encourage is while impel is to urge a person; to press on; to incite to action or motion via intrinsic motivation (contrast with propel, to compel or drive extrinsically).

Impel vs Promote - What's the difference?

impel | promote | Related terms |

Impel is a related term of promote.


As verbs the difference between impel and promote

is that impel is to urge a person; to press on; to incite to action or motion via intrinsic motivation (contrast with propel, to compel or drive extrinsically) while promote is to raise (someone) to a more important, responsible, or remunerative job or rank.

Impel vs Irritate - What's the difference?

impel | irritate | Related terms |

Impel is a related term of irritate.


As verbs the difference between impel and irritate

is that impel is to urge a person; to press on; to incite to action or motion via intrinsic motivation (contrast with propel, to compel or drive extrinsically) while irritate is (lb) to provoke impatience, anger, or displeasure.

Pages