hault

Hoult vs Hault - What's the difference?

hoult | hault |


As a noun hoult

is (label) a wood; copse.

As an adjective hault is

(obsolete) lofty; haughty.

Hault vs Hauls - What's the difference?

hault | hauls |


As an adjective hault

is (obsolete) lofty; haughty.

As a verb hauls is

(haul).

Haunt vs Hault - What's the difference?

haunt | hault |


As a verb haunt

is to inhabit, or visit frequently (most often used in reference to ghosts).

As a noun haunt

is a place at which one is regularly found; a hangout.

As an adjective hault is

(obsolete) lofty; haughty.

Hault vs Halt - What's the difference?

hault | halt |


As an adjective hault

is (obsolete) lofty; haughty.

As a verb halt is

.

Haughty vs Hault - What's the difference?

haughty | hault |


As adjectives the difference between haughty and hault

is that haughty is conveying in demeanour the assumption of superiority; disdainful, supercilious while hault is (obsolete) lofty; haughty.

Hault vs Stop - What's the difference?

hault | stop |


As an adjective hault

is (obsolete) lofty; haughty.

As a verb stop is

(label) to cease moving.

As a noun stop is

a (usually marked) place where line buses, trams or trains halt to let passengers get on and off, usually smaller than a station or stop can be a small well-bucket; a milk-pail.

As an adverb stop is

prone to halting or hesitation.

As an interjection stop is

halt! stop!.

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