graupel

Hail vs Graupel - What's the difference?

hail | graupel |


As nouns the difference between hail and graupel

is that hail is balls or pieces of ice falling as precipitation, often in connection with a thunderstorm while graupel is (uncountable) a precipitation that forms when supercooled droplets of water condense on a snowflake.

As a verb hail

is (impersonal) said of the weather when hail is falling or hail can be to greet; give salutation to; salute.

As an adjective hail

is (obsolete) healthy, whole, safe.

As an interjection hail

is an exclamation of respectful or reverent salutation, or, occasionally, of familiar greeting.

Graupel vs Sleet - What's the difference?

graupel | sleet |

Graupel is a see also of sleet.


As nouns the difference between graupel and sleet

is that graupel is (uncountable) a precipitation that forms when supercooled droplets of water condense on a snowflake while sleet is (chiefly|british) a mixture of rain and snow.

As a verb sleet is

(impersonal|of the weather) to be in a state in which sleet is falling.

What is the difference between graupel and snow?

graupel | snow |

Graupel is a see also of snow.


In context|uncountable|lang=en terms the difference between graupel and snow

is that graupel is (uncountable) a precipitation that forms when supercooled droplets of water condense on a snowflake while snow is (uncountable) the area of frequency on a television which has no programmes broadcast in analogue sets, the image is created by the electrical noise.

In context|countable|lang=en terms the difference between graupel and snow

is that graupel is (countable) the result of this process, a small ball of rime while snow is (countable) a snowfall; a blanket of frozen, crystalline water.

As nouns the difference between graupel and snow

is that graupel is (uncountable) a precipitation that forms when supercooled droplets of water condense on a snowflake while snow is (uncountable) the frozen, crystalline state of water that falls as precipitation.

As a verb snow is

(impersonal) to have snow fall from the sky.

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