girt

Girt vs Purloin - What's the difference?

girt | purloin |


As verbs the difference between girt and purloin

is that girt is to gird or girt can be (gird) while purloin is to take the property of another, often in breach of trust; to appropriate wrongfully; to steal.

As a noun girt

is a horizontal structural member of post and beam architecture, typically attached to bridge two or more vertical members such as corner posts.

As an adjective girt

is (nautical) bound by a cable; used of a vessel so moored by two anchors that she swings against one of the cables by force of the current or tide.

Beam vs Girt - What's the difference?

beam | girt |


In nautical|lang=en terms the difference between beam and girt

is that beam is (nautical) the maximum width of a vessel while girt is (nautical) bound by a cable; used of a vessel so moored by two anchors that she swings against one of the cables by force of the current or tide.

As nouns the difference between beam and girt

is that beam is any large piece of timber or iron long in proportion to its thickness, and prepared for use while girt is a horizontal structural member of post and beam architecture, typically attached to bridge two or more vertical members such as corner posts.

As verbs the difference between beam and girt

is that beam is (ambitransitive) to emit beams of light; shine; radiate while girt is to gird or girt can be (gird).

As an adjective girt is

(nautical) bound by a cable; used of a vessel so moored by two anchors that she swings against one of the cables by force of the current or tide.

Girt vs Environ - What's the difference?

girt | environ |


As verbs the difference between girt and environ

is that girt is to gird or girt can be (gird) while environ is to surround; to encircle.

As a noun girt

is a horizontal structural member of post and beam architecture, typically attached to bridge two or more vertical members such as corner posts.

As an adjective girt

is (nautical) bound by a cable; used of a vessel so moored by two anchors that she swings against one of the cables by force of the current or tide.

Rafter vs Girt - What's the difference?

rafter | girt |


As nouns the difference between rafter and girt

is that rafter is one of a series of sloped beams that extend from the ridge or hip to the downslope perimeter or eave, designed to support the roof deck and its associated loads while girt is a horizontal structural member of post and beam architecture, typically attached to bridge two or more vertical members such as corner posts.

As verbs the difference between rafter and girt

is that rafter is to make (timber, etc.) into rafters while girt is to gird.

As an adjective girt is

bound by a cable; used of a vessel so moored by two anchors that she swings against one of the cables by force of the current or tide.

Girt vs Present - What's the difference?

girt | present |


As nouns the difference between girt and present

is that girt is a horizontal structural member of post and beam architecture, typically attached to bridge two or more vertical members such as corner posts while present is the current moment or period of time.

As verbs the difference between girt and present

is that girt is to gird while present is to bring (someone) into the presence of (a person); to introduce formally.

As adjectives the difference between girt and present

is that girt is bound by a cable; used of a vessel so moored by two anchors that she swings against one of the cables by force of the current or tide while present is relating to now, for the time being; current.

Encircle vs Girt - What's the difference?

encircle | girt |


As verbs the difference between encircle and girt

is that encircle is to surround, form a circle around while girt is to gird or girt can be (gird).

As a noun girt is

a horizontal structural member of post and beam architecture, typically attached to bridge two or more vertical members such as corner posts.

As an adjective girt is

(nautical) bound by a cable; used of a vessel so moored by two anchors that she swings against one of the cables by force of the current or tide.

Girt vs Purlin - What's the difference?

girt | purlin |


As nouns the difference between girt and purlin

is that girt is a horizontal structural member of post and beam architecture, typically attached to bridge two or more vertical members such as corner posts while purlin is a longitudinal structural member bridging two or more rafters of a roof.

As a verb girt

is to gird.

As an adjective girt

is bound by a cable; used of a vessel so moored by two anchors that she swings against one of the cables by force of the current or tide.

Knack vs Girt - What's the difference?

knack | girt |


As nouns the difference between knack and girt

is that knack is a traditional swedish toffee prepared at christmas while girt is a horizontal structural member of post and beam architecture, typically attached to bridge two or more vertical members such as corner posts.

As verbs the difference between knack and girt

is that knack is while girt is to gird or girt can be (gird).

As an adjective girt is

(nautical) bound by a cable; used of a vessel so moored by two anchors that she swings against one of the cables by force of the current or tide.

Ledger vs Girt - What's the difference?

ledger | girt |


As nouns the difference between ledger and girt

is that ledger is a book for keeping notes, especially one for keeping accounting records while girt is a horizontal structural member of post and beam architecture, typically attached to bridge two or more vertical members such as corner posts.

As a verb girt is

to gird.

As an adjective girt is

bound by a cable; used of a vessel so moored by two anchors that she swings against one of the cables by force of the current or tide.

Ringlet vs Girt - What's the difference?

ringlet | girt | Related terms |

Ringlet is a related term of girt.


As nouns the difference between ringlet and girt

is that ringlet is a small ring while girt is a horizontal structural member of post and beam architecture, typically attached to bridge two or more vertical members such as corner posts.

As a verb girt is

to gird or girt can be (gird).

As an adjective girt is

(nautical) bound by a cable; used of a vessel so moored by two anchors that she swings against one of the cables by force of the current or tide.

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