futile

Avail vs Futile - What's the difference?

avail | futile |


As a verb avail

is (transitive|often|reflexive) to turn to the advantage of.

As a noun avail

is (lb) benefit; value, profit; advantage toward success.

As an adjective futile is

incapable of producing results; useless; not successful; not worth attempting.

Shenanigan vs Futile - What's the difference?

shenanigan | futile |


As a noun shenanigan

is (countable) a deceitful confidence trick, or mischief causing discomfort or annoyance.

As an adjective futile is

incapable of producing results; useless; not successful; not worth attempting.

Futile vs Effete - What's the difference?

futile | effete |


As adjectives the difference between futile and effete

is that futile is incapable of producing results; useless; not successful; not worth attempting while effete is (label) of substances, quantities etc: exhausted, spent, worn-out.

Trifle vs Futile - What's the difference?

trifle | futile |


As a noun trifle

is an english dessert made from a mixture of thick custard, fruit, sponge cake, jelly and whipped cream.

As a verb trifle

is to deal with something as if it were of little importance or worth.

As an adjective futile is

incapable of producing results; useless; not successful; not worth attempting.

Trial vs Futile - What's the difference?

trial | futile |


As adjectives the difference between trial and futile

is that trial is pertaining to a trial or test or trial can be characterized by having three (usually equivalent) components while futile is incapable of producing results; useless; not successful; not worth attempting.

As a noun trial

is an opportunity to test something out; a test.

As a verb trial

is to carry out a series of tests on (a new product, procedure etc) before marketing or implementing it.

Unoccupied vs Futile - What's the difference?

unoccupied | futile | Related terms |

Unoccupied is a related term of futile.


As adjectives the difference between unoccupied and futile

is that unoccupied is (of a house etc) not inhabited, especially by a tenant while futile is incapable of producing results; useless; not successful; not worth attempting.

Futile vs Hamper - What's the difference?

futile | hamper |


As an adjective futile

is incapable of producing results; useless; not successful; not worth attempting.

As a noun hamper is

a large basket, usually with a cover, used for the packing and carrying of articles or small animals; as, or hamper can be a shackle; a fetter; anything which impedes.

As a verb hamper is

to put into a hamper or hamper can be to put a hamper or fetter on; to shackle; to ensnare; to inveigle; hence, to impede in motion or progress; to embarrass; to encumber.

Futile vs Trifling - What's the difference?

futile | trifling | Synonyms |

Futile is a synonym of trifling.


As adjectives the difference between futile and trifling

is that futile is incapable of producing results; useless; not successful; not worth attempting while trifling is trivial, or of little importance.

As a noun trifling is

the act of one who trifles; frivolous behaviour.

Fallow vs Futile - What's the difference?

fallow | futile |


As adjectives the difference between fallow and futile

is that fallow is (of agricultural land) ploughed but left unseeded for more than one planting season or fallow can be of a pale red or yellow, light brown; dun while futile is incapable of producing results; useless; not successful; not worth attempting.

As a noun fallow

is (agriculture|uncountable) ground ploughed and harrowed but left unseeded for one year.

As a verb fallow

is to make land fallow for agricultural purposes.

Indolent vs Futile - What's the difference?

indolent | futile | Related terms |

Indolent is a related term of futile.


As adjectives the difference between indolent and futile

is that indolent is habitually]] lazy, [[procrastinate|procrastinating, or resistant to physical labor/labour while futile is incapable of producing results; useless; not successful; not worth attempting.

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