endorse

Endorse vs Suppose - What's the difference?

endorse | suppose |


As verbs the difference between endorse and suppose

is that endorse is to support, to back, to give one's approval to, especially officially or by signature while suppose is .

As a noun endorse

is (heraldiccharge) a diminutive of the pale, usually appearing in pairs on either side of a pale.

Endorse vs Assent - What's the difference?

endorse | assent |


As verbs the difference between endorse and assent

is that endorse is to support, to back, to give one's approval to, especially officially or by signature while assent is to agree to, give approval.

As nouns the difference between endorse and assent

is that endorse is (heraldiccharge) a diminutive of the pale, usually appearing in pairs on either side of a pale while assent is agreement, act of agreeing.

Permit vs Endorse - What's the difference?

permit | endorse |


As verbs the difference between permit and endorse

is that permit is while endorse is to support, to back, to give one's approval to, especially officially or by signature.

As a noun endorse is

(heraldiccharge) a diminutive of the pale, usually appearing in pairs on either side of a pale.

Endorse vs Endeavor - What's the difference?

endorse | endeavor |


As verbs the difference between endorse and endeavor

is that endorse is to support, to back, to give one's approval to, especially officially or by signature while endeavor is (obsolete) to exert oneself.

As nouns the difference between endorse and endeavor

is that endorse is (heraldiccharge) a diminutive of the pale, usually appearing in pairs on either side of a pale while endeavor is a sincere attempt; a determined or assiduous effort towards a specific goal.

Endorse vs Admit - What's the difference?

endorse | admit |


As verbs the difference between endorse and admit

is that endorse is to support, to back, to give one's approval to, especially officially or by signature while admit is .

As a noun endorse

is (heraldiccharge) a diminutive of the pale, usually appearing in pairs on either side of a pale.

Noted vs Endorse - What's the difference?

noted | endorse |


As verbs the difference between noted and endorse

is that noted is (note) while endorse is to support, to back, to give one's approval to, especially officially or by signature.

As an adjective noted

is famous; well known because of one's reputation; celebrated.

As a noun endorse is

(heraldiccharge) a diminutive of the pale, usually appearing in pairs on either side of a pale.

Decision vs Endorse - What's the difference?

decision | endorse |


As nouns the difference between decision and endorse

is that decision is decision while endorse is (heraldiccharge) a diminutive of the pale, usually appearing in pairs on either side of a pale.

As a verb endorse is

to support, to back, to give one's approval to, especially officially or by signature.

Vouch vs Endorse - What's the difference?

vouch | endorse |


As verbs the difference between vouch and endorse

is that vouch is to take responsibility for; to express confidence in; to witness; to obtest while endorse is to support, to back, to give one's approval to, especially officially or by signature.

As nouns the difference between vouch and endorse

is that vouch is warrant; attestation while endorse is (heraldiccharge) a diminutive of the pale, usually appearing in pairs on either side of a pale.

Promulgate vs Endorse - What's the difference?

promulgate | endorse |


As verbs the difference between promulgate and endorse

is that promulgate is to make known or public while endorse is to support, to back, to give one's approval to, especially officially or by signature.

As a noun endorse is

(heraldiccharge) a diminutive of the pale, usually appearing in pairs on either side of a pale.

Lean vs Endorse - What's the difference?

lean | endorse |


As a proper noun lean

is .

As a verb endorse is

to support, to back, to give one's approval to, especially officially or by signature.

As a noun endorse is

(heraldiccharge) a diminutive of the pale, usually appearing in pairs on either side of a pale.

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