discourse

Remark vs Discourse - What's the difference?

remark | discourse |


In lang=en terms the difference between remark and discourse

is that remark is to mark again (a piece of work) while discourse is to write or speak formally and at length.

As nouns the difference between remark and discourse

is that remark is act of pointing out or attentively noticing; notice or observation or remark can be a mark that replaces another mark while discourse is (uncountable|archaic) verbal exchange, conversation.

As verbs the difference between remark and discourse

is that remark is to make a remark or remarks; to comment or remark can be to mark again (a piece of work) while discourse is to engage in discussion or conversation; to converse.

Discourse vs Monologue - What's the difference?

discourse | monologue |


As verbs the difference between discourse and monologue

is that discourse is to engage in discussion or conversation; to converse while monologue is .

As a noun discourse

is (uncountable|archaic) verbal exchange, conversation.

Multilogue vs Discourse - What's the difference?

multilogue | discourse |


As nouns the difference between multilogue and discourse

is that multilogue is a conversation described as many-to-many the term is commonly used to describe the nature of conversations and interactions using social media and collaborative tools, such as social networking, online video, widgets for syndication, wikis, message boards, forums, etc while discourse is (uncountable|archaic) verbal exchange, conversation.

As a verb discourse is

to engage in discussion or conversation; to converse.

Norm vs Discourse - What's the difference?

norm | discourse |


As a proper noun norm

is .

As a noun discourse is

(uncountable|archaic) verbal exchange, conversation.

As a verb discourse is

to engage in discussion or conversation; to converse.

Discourse vs Episteme - What's the difference?

discourse | episteme |


As nouns the difference between discourse and episteme

is that discourse is (uncountable|archaic) verbal exchange, conversation while episteme is episteme (foucaultian philosophy).

As a verb discourse

is to engage in discussion or conversation; to converse.

Discourse vs Manifest - What's the difference?

discourse | manifest |


As nouns the difference between discourse and manifest

is that discourse is (uncountable|archaic) verbal exchange, conversation while manifest is manifesto.

As a verb discourse

is to engage in discussion or conversation; to converse.

Superfluous vs Discourse - What's the difference?

superfluous | discourse |


As an adjective superfluous

is in excess of what is required or sufficient.

As a noun discourse is

(uncountable|archaic) verbal exchange, conversation.

As a verb discourse is

to engage in discussion or conversation; to converse.

Discourse vs Utterance - What's the difference?

discourse | utterance |


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between discourse and utterance

is that discourse is (obsolete) dealing; transaction while utterance is (obsolete) putting in circulation.

As nouns the difference between discourse and utterance

is that discourse is (uncountable|archaic) verbal exchange, conversation while utterance is an act of uttering or utterance can be the utmost extremity (of a fight etc).

As a verb discourse

is to engage in discussion or conversation; to converse.

Idiom vs Discourse - What's the difference?

idiom | discourse | Related terms |

Idiom is a related term of discourse.


As nouns the difference between idiom and discourse

is that idiom is idiom while discourse is (uncountable|archaic) verbal exchange, conversation.

As a verb discourse is

to engage in discussion or conversation; to converse.

Ideology vs Discourse - What's the difference?

ideology | discourse |


As nouns the difference between ideology and discourse

is that ideology is doctrine, philosophy, body of beliefs or principles belonging to an individual or group while discourse is (uncountable|archaic) verbal exchange, conversation.

As a verb discourse is

to engage in discussion or conversation; to converse.

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