discharge

Discharge vs Excretion - What's the difference?

discharge | excretion |


As nouns the difference between discharge and excretion

is that discharge is (symptom) (uncountable ) pus or exudate (other than blood) from a wound or orifice, usually due to infection or pathology while excretion is excretion.

As a verb discharge

is to accomplish or complete, as an obligation.

Discharge vs Eradicate - What's the difference?

discharge | eradicate |


As verbs the difference between discharge and eradicate

is that discharge is to accomplish or complete, as an obligation while eradicate is to pull up by the roots; to uproot.

As a noun discharge

is (symptom) (uncountable ) pus or exudate (other than blood) from a wound or orifice, usually due to infection or pathology.

Fluid vs Discharge - What's the difference?

fluid | discharge |


As nouns the difference between fluid and discharge

is that fluid is fluid while discharge is (symptom) (uncountable ) pus or exudate (other than blood) from a wound or orifice, usually due to infection or pathology.

As a verb discharge is

to accomplish or complete, as an obligation.

Discharge vs Vomit - What's the difference?

discharge | vomit |


As nouns the difference between discharge and vomit

is that discharge is (symptom) (uncountable ) pus or exudate (other than blood) from a wound or orifice, usually due to infection or pathology while vomit is vomit.

As a verb discharge

is to accomplish or complete, as an obligation.

Discharge vs Layoff - What's the difference?

discharge | layoff |


As nouns the difference between discharge and layoff

is that discharge is (symptom) (uncountable ) pus or exudate (other than blood) from a wound or orifice, usually due to infection or pathology while layoff is a dismissal of employees from their jobs because of tightened budgetary constraints or work shortage (not due to poor performance or misconduct).

As a verb discharge

is to accomplish or complete, as an obligation.

Discharge vs Rate - What's the difference?

discharge | rate |


As nouns the difference between discharge and rate

is that discharge is (symptom) (uncountable ) pus or exudate (other than blood) from a wound or orifice, usually due to infection or pathology while rate is rot (process of something decaying or rotting ).

As a verb discharge

is to accomplish or complete, as an obligation.

Disperse vs Discharge - What's the difference?

disperse | discharge |


As verbs the difference between disperse and discharge

is that disperse is while discharge is to accomplish or complete, as an obligation.

As a noun discharge is

(symptom) (uncountable ) pus or exudate (other than blood) from a wound or orifice, usually due to infection or pathology.

Relieve vs Discharge - What's the difference?

relieve | discharge |


As verbs the difference between relieve and discharge

is that relieve is to ease (a person, person's thoughts etc) from mental distress; to stop (someone) feeling anxious or worried, to alleviate the distress of while discharge is to accomplish or complete, as an obligation.

As a noun discharge is

(symptom) (uncountable ) pus or exudate (other than blood) from a wound or orifice, usually due to infection or pathology.

Emancipate vs Discharge - What's the difference?

emancipate | discharge |


As verbs the difference between emancipate and discharge

is that emancipate is to set free from the power of another; to liberate; as: while discharge is to accomplish or complete, as an obligation.

As an adjective emancipate

is freed; set at liberty.

As a noun discharge is

(symptom) (uncountable ) pus or exudate (other than blood) from a wound or orifice, usually due to infection or pathology.

Discharge vs Eviction - What's the difference?

discharge | eviction |


As nouns the difference between discharge and eviction

is that discharge is (symptom) (uncountable ) pus or exudate (other than blood) from a wound or orifice, usually due to infection or pathology while eviction is eviction (the act of evicting).

As a verb discharge

is to accomplish or complete, as an obligation.

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