desecrate

Desecrate vs Morbidity - What's the difference?

desecrate | morbidity |


As a verb desecrate

is (transitive)  to profane or violate the sacredness or sanctity of something.

As an adjective desecrate

is desecrated.

As a noun morbidity is

the quality of being unhealthful, morbid, sometimes including the cause.

Desecrate vs Pervert - What's the difference?

desecrate | pervert |


In lang=en terms the difference between desecrate and pervert

is that desecrate is (transitive)  to inappropriately change while pervert is to become perverted; to take the wrong course.

As verbs the difference between desecrate and pervert

is that desecrate is (transitive)  to profane or violate the sacredness or sanctity of something while pervert is to turn another way; to divert.

As an adjective desecrate

is desecrated.

As a noun pervert is

(dated) one who has been perverted; one who has turned to error; one who has turned to a twisted sense of values or morals.

Desecrate vs Pillage - What's the difference?

desecrate | pillage |


As verbs the difference between desecrate and pillage

is that desecrate is (transitive)  to profane or violate the sacredness or sanctity of something while pillage is (ambitransitive) to loot or plunder by force, especially in time of war.

As an adjective desecrate

is desecrated.

As a noun pillage is

the spoils of war.

Desecrate vs Despoil - What's the difference?

desecrate | despoil |


As verbs the difference between desecrate and despoil

is that desecrate is (transitive)  to profane or violate the sacredness or sanctity of something while despoil is to deprive for spoil; to take spoil from; to plunder; to rob; to pillage.

As an adjective desecrate

is desecrated.

As a noun despoil is

(obsolete) plunder; spoliation.

Desecrate vs Blasphemy - What's the difference?

desecrate | blasphemy |


As a verb desecrate

is (transitive)  to profane or violate the sacredness or sanctity of something.

As an adjective desecrate

is desecrated.

As a noun blasphemy is

irreverence toward something considered sacred or inviolable.

Execrate vs Desecrate - What's the difference?

execrate | desecrate |


As verbs the difference between execrate and desecrate

is that execrate is to feel loathing for; abhor while desecrate is (transitive)  to profane or violate the sacredness or sanctity of something.

As an adjective desecrate is

desecrated.

Desecrate vs Besmirch - What's the difference?

desecrate | besmirch |


In lang=en terms the difference between desecrate and besmirch

is that desecrate is (transitive)  to inappropriately change while besmirch is to tarnish something, especially someone's reputation; to debase.

As verbs the difference between desecrate and besmirch

is that desecrate is (transitive)  to profane or violate the sacredness or sanctity of something while besmirch is to make dirty; to soil.

As an adjective desecrate

is desecrated.

Desecrate vs Deny - What's the difference?

desecrate | deny |


In lang=en terms the difference between desecrate and deny

is that desecrate is (transitive)  to inappropriately change while deny is to refuse to give or grant something to someone.

As verbs the difference between desecrate and deny

is that desecrate is (transitive)  to profane or violate the sacredness or sanctity of something while deny is to not allow.

As an adjective desecrate

is desecrated.

Desecrate vs Befoul - What's the difference?

desecrate | befoul |


As verbs the difference between desecrate and befoul

is that desecrate is (transitive)  to profane or violate the sacredness or sanctity of something while befoul is to make foul; to soil.

As an adjective desecrate

is desecrated.

Decimate vs Desecrate - What's the difference?

decimate | desecrate |


As verbs the difference between decimate and desecrate

is that decimate is (roman history) to kill one man chosen by lot out of every ten in a legion or other military group while desecrate is (transitive)  to profane or violate the sacredness or sanctity of something.

As an adjective desecrate is

desecrated.

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