dead

What is the difference between dead and fallen?

dead | fallen |


As adjectives the difference between dead and fallen

is that dead is (not comparable) no longer living while fallen is having dropped by the force of gravity.

As nouns the difference between dead and fallen

is that dead is (in the singular) time when coldness, darkness, or stillness is most intense while fallen is (pluralonly) the dead.

As verbs the difference between dead and fallen

is that dead is (archaic) formerly, "be dead" was used instead of "have died" as the perfect tense of "die" while fallen is .

As a adverb dead

is exactly right.

What is the difference between dead and hot?

dead | hot | Antonyms |

Dead is an antonym of hot.


In context|informal|lang=en terms the difference between dead and hot

is that dead is (informal) (certain to be) in big trouble while hot is (informal) very good, remarkable, exciting.

In context|slang|lang=en terms the difference between dead and hot

is that dead is (slang) very, absolutely, extremely, suddenly while hot is (slang) sexual; involving sexual intercourse or sexual excitement.

As adjectives the difference between dead and hot

is that dead is (not comparable) no longer living while hot is of an object, having a high temperature.

As verbs the difference between dead and hot

is that dead is (archaic) formerly, "be dead" was used instead of "have died" as the perfect tense of "die" while hot is to heat, or to become hot.

As a noun dead

is (in the singular) time when coldness, darkness, or stillness is most intense.

As a adverb dead

is exactly right.

What is the difference between dead and dormant?

dead | dormant |


As adjectives the difference between dead and dormant

is that dead is (not comparable) no longer living while dormant is inactive, asleep, suspended.

As a noun dead

is (in the singular) time when coldness, darkness, or stillness is most intense.

As a adverb dead

is exactly right.

As a verb dead

is (archaic) formerly, "be dead" was used instead of "have died" as the perfect tense of "die".

What is the difference between dead and die?

dead | die |


As nouns the difference between dead and die

is that dead is {{senseid|en|time when coldness, darkness, or stillness is most intense}}(in the singular) time when coldness, darkness, or stillness is most intense while die is (plural: dice) a polyhedron, usually a cube, with numbers or symbols on each side and used in games of chance.

As verbs the difference between dead and die

is that dead is (archaic) formerly, "be dead" was used instead of "have died" as the perfect tense of "die" while die is to stop living; to become dead; to undergo death.

As a adjective dead

is (not comparable) no longer living.

As a adverb dead

is exactly right.

What is the difference between burn and dead?

burn | dead |


In context|slang|lang=en terms the difference between burn and dead

is that burn is {{context|slang|lang=en}} an intense non-physical sting, as left by an effective insult while dead is {{context|slang|lang=en}} very, absolutely, extremely, suddenly.

In context|transitive|lang=en terms the difference between burn and dead

is that burn is {{context|transitive|lang=en}} to waste (time) while dead is {{context|transitive|lang=en}} to make dead; to deaden; to deprive of life, force, or vigour.

As nouns the difference between burn and dead

is that burn is a physical injury caused by heat or cold or electricity or radiation or caustic chemicals or burn can be {{context|scotland|northern england|lang=en}} a stream while dead is {{senseid|en|time when coldness, darkness, or stillness is most intense}}{{context|in the singular|lang=en}} time when coldness, darkness, or stillness is most intense.

As verbs the difference between burn and dead

is that burn is {{context|intransitive|lang=en}} to be consumed by fire, or at least in flames while dead is {{context|archaic|lang=en}} formerly, "be dead" was used instead of "have died" as the perfect tense of "die".

As a adjective dead is

{{context|not comparable|lang=en}} no longer living.

As a adverb dead is

exactly right.

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