cower

Cower vs Dear - What's the difference?

cower | dear |


As verbs the difference between cower and dear

is that cower is to crouch or cringe, or to avoid or shy away from something, in fear or cower can be (obsolete|transitive) to cherish with care while dear is (obsolete) to endear.

As an adjective dear is

loved; lovable or dear can be severe(ly affected), sore.

As a noun dear is

a very kind, loving person.

As an adverb dear is

(obsolete) dearly; at a high price.

Shudder vs Cower - What's the difference?

shudder | cower |


As verbs the difference between shudder and cower

is that shudder is to shake nervously, as if from fear while cower is to crouch or cringe, or to avoid or shy away from something, in fear or cower can be (obsolete|transitive) to cherish with care.

As a noun shudder

is a shivering tremor.

Cower vs Hunker - What's the difference?

cower | hunker |


As verbs the difference between cower and hunker

is that cower is to crouch or cringe, or to avoid or shy away from something, in fear or cower can be (obsolete|transitive) to cherish with care while hunker is to crouch or squat close to the ground.

As a noun hunker is

(dated) a political conservative.

Cower vs Succumb - What's the difference?

cower | succumb | Related terms |

Cower is a related term of succumb.


As verbs the difference between cower and succumb

is that cower is to crouch or cringe, or to avoid or shy away from something, in fear or cower can be (obsolete|transitive) to cherish with care while succumb is (lb) to yield to an overpowering force or overwhelming desire.

Yield vs Cower - What's the difference?

yield | cower | Related terms |

Yield is a related term of cower.


As verbs the difference between yield and cower

is that yield is (obsolete) to pay, give in payment; repay, recompense; reward; requite while cower is to crouch or cringe, or to avoid or shy away from something, in fear or cower can be (obsolete|transitive) to cherish with care.

As a noun yield

is (obsolete) payment; tribute.

Contort vs Cower - What's the difference?

contort | cower |


As verbs the difference between contort and cower

is that contort is to twist in a violent manner; as, features contorted with fury while cower is to crouch or cringe, or to avoid or shy away from something, in fear or cower can be (obsolete|transitive) to cherish with care.

Cower vs Confection - What's the difference?

cower | confection |


As verbs the difference between cower and confection

is that cower is to crouch or cringe, or to avoid or shy away from something, in fear or cower can be (obsolete|transitive) to cherish with care while confection is to make into a confection, prepare as a confection.

As a noun confection is

a food item prepared very sweet, frequently decorated in fine detail, and often preserved with sugar, such as a candy, sweetmeat, fruit preserve, pastry, or cake.

Descend vs Cower - What's the difference?

descend | cower | Related terms |

Descend is a related term of cower.


As verbs the difference between descend and cower

is that descend is to pass from a higher to a lower place; to move downwards; to come or go down in any way, as by falling, flowing, walking, etc; to plunge; to fall; to incline downward while cower is to crouch or cringe, or to avoid or shy away from something, in fear or cower can be (obsolete|transitive) to cherish with care.

Condescend vs Cower - What's the difference?

condescend | cower | Related terms |

Condescend is a related term of cower.


As verbs the difference between condescend and cower

is that condescend is (lb) to come down from one's superior position; to deign (to do something) while cower is to crouch or cringe, or to avoid or shy away from something, in fear or cower can be (obsolete|transitive) to cherish with care.

Stoop vs Cower - What's the difference?

stoop | cower | Synonyms |

Stoop is a synonym of cower.


As verbs the difference between stoop and cower

is that stoop is to bend the upper part of the body forward and downward while cower is to crouch or cringe, or to avoid or shy away from something, in fear or cower can be (obsolete|transitive) to cherish with care.

As a noun stoop

is the staircase and landing or porch leading to the entrance of a residence or stoop can be a stooping (ie bent, see the "verb" section above) position of the body or stoop can be (dialect) a post or pillar, especially a gatepost or a support in a mine or stoop can be a vessel of liquor; a flagon.

Pages