copse

Copse vs Hedge - What's the difference?

copse | hedge |


As nouns the difference between copse and hedge

is that copse is a thicket of small trees or shrubs while hedge is a thicket of bushes, usually thorn bushes; especially, such a thicket planted as a fence between any two portions of land; and also any sort of shrubbery, as evergreens, planted in a line or as a fence; particularly, such a thicket planted round a field to fence it, or in rows to separate the parts of a garden.

As verbs the difference between copse and hedge

is that copse is (horticulture) to trim or cut while hedge is to enclose with a hedge or hedges.

Copse vs Tree - What's the difference?

copse | tree |


As nouns the difference between copse and tree

is that copse is a thicket of small trees or shrubs while tree is a large plant, not exactly defined, but typically over four meters in height, a single trunk which grows in girth with age and branches (which also grow in circumference with age).

As verbs the difference between copse and tree

is that copse is (horticulture) to trim or cut while tree is to chase (an animal or person) up a tree.

Timberland vs Copse - What's the difference?

timberland | copse |


As nouns the difference between timberland and copse

is that timberland is forested land thought of in terms of its potential and value as timber while copse is a thicket of small trees or shrubs.

As a verb copse is

(horticulture) to trim or cut.

Copse vs Cove - What's the difference?

copse | cove |


As a noun copse

is a thicket of small trees or shrubs.

As a verb copse

is (horticulture) to trim or cut.

As a proper noun cove is

a town in arkansas.

Copse vs Null - What's the difference?

copse | null |


As nouns the difference between copse and null

is that copse is a thicket of small trees or shrubs while null is zero, nil; the cardinal number before einn.

As a verb copse

is (horticulture) to trim or cut.

Copse vs Woodland - What's the difference?

copse | woodland |


As nouns the difference between copse and woodland

is that copse is a thicket of small trees or shrubs while woodland is land covered with woody vegetation.

As a verb copse

is (horticulture) to trim or cut.

As an adjective woodland is

of or pertaining to a creature or object growing, living, or existing in a woodland.

Assemblage vs Copse - What's the difference?

assemblage | copse | Related terms |

Assemblage is a related term of copse.


As nouns the difference between assemblage and copse

is that assemblage is a collection of things which have been gathered together or assembled while copse is a thicket of small trees or shrubs.

As a verb copse is

(horticulture) to trim or cut.

Clump vs Copse - What's the difference?

clump | copse | Synonyms |

Clump is a synonym of copse.


As nouns the difference between clump and copse

is that clump is a cluster or lump; an unshaped piece or mass while copse is a thicket of small trees or shrubs.

As verbs the difference between clump and copse

is that clump is to form clusters or lumps while copse is (horticulture) to trim or cut.

Shock vs Copse - What's the difference?

shock | copse | Related terms |

Shock is a related term of copse.


As nouns the difference between shock and copse

is that shock is sudden, heavy impact or shock can be an arrangement of sheaves for drying, a stook while copse is a thicket of small trees or shrubs.

As verbs the difference between shock and copse

is that shock is to cause to be emotionally shocked or shock can be to collect, or make up, into a shock or shocks; to stook while copse is (horticulture) to trim or cut.

Bunch vs Copse - What's the difference?

bunch | copse | Related terms |

Bunch is a related term of copse.


As nouns the difference between bunch and copse

is that bunch is a group of a number of similar things, either growing together, or in a cluster or clump, usually fastened together while copse is a thicket of small trees or shrubs.

As verbs the difference between bunch and copse

is that bunch is to gather into a bunch while copse is (horticulture) to trim or cut.

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