coarse

Approximate vs Coarse - What's the difference?

approximate | coarse |


As adjectives the difference between approximate and coarse

is that approximate is approaching; proximate; nearly resembling while coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture.

As a verb approximate

is to carry or advance near; to cause to approach.

Coarse vs Boisterous - What's the difference?

coarse | boisterous | Related terms |

Coarse is a related term of boisterous.


As adjectives the difference between coarse and boisterous

is that coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture while boisterous is full of energy; exuberant; noisy.

Coarse vs Insolent - What's the difference?

coarse | insolent | Related terms |

Coarse is a related term of insolent.


As adjectives the difference between coarse and insolent

is that coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture while insolent is insulting in manner or words.

Gruff vs Coarse - What's the difference?

gruff | coarse |


As adjectives the difference between gruff and coarse

is that gruff is having a rough, surly, and harsh demeanor and nature while coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture.

As a verb gruff

is to speak gruffly.

Coarse vs Sour - What's the difference?

coarse | sour | Related terms |

Coarse is a related term of sour.


As adjectives the difference between coarse and sour

is that coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture while sour is having an acidic, sharp or tangy taste.

As a noun sour is

the sensation of a sour taste.

As a verb sour is

(label) to make sour.

Coarse vs Ill-bred - What's the difference?

coarse | ill-bred | Related terms |

Coarse is a related term of ill-bred.


As adjectives the difference between coarse and ill-bred

is that coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture while ill-bred is ill-mannered and unrefined because of a bad upbringing or education.

Coarse vs Low - What's the difference?

coarse | low | Related terms |

Coarse is a related term of low.


As adjectives the difference between coarse and low

is that coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture while low is in a position comparatively close to the ground.

As a noun low is

something that is low; a low point or low can be (countable|uk|scotland|dialect) a flame; fire; blaze or low can be , mound, tumulus.

As an adverb low is

close to the ground.

As a verb low is

(obsolete|transitive) to depress; to lower or low can be or low can be to moo or low can be (uk|scotland|dialect) to burn; to blaze.

Coarse vs Offensive - What's the difference?

coarse | offensive | Related terms |

Coarse is a related term of offensive.


As an adjective coarse

is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture.

As a noun offensive is

offensive (posture of attacking or being able to attack).

Coarse vs Curse - What's the difference?

coarse | curse |


As an adjective coarse

is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture.

As a verb curse is

.

Coarse vs Currish - What's the difference?

coarse | currish | Related terms |

Coarse is a related term of currish.


As adjectives the difference between coarse and currish

is that coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture while currish is pertaining to a cur or mongrel.

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