caravel

Caravel vs Canoe - What's the difference?

caravel | canoe |


As nouns the difference between caravel and canoe

is that caravel is (nautical) a light, usually lateen-rigged sailing ship used by the portuguese, as well as spanish, for about 300 years, beginning in the fifteenth century, first for trade and later for voyages of exploration while canoe is .

Caravel vs Armada - What's the difference?

caravel | armada |


As nouns the difference between caravel and armada

is that caravel is (nautical) a light, usually lateen-rigged sailing ship used by the portuguese, as well as spanish, for about 300 years, beginning in the fifteenth century, first for trade and later for voyages of exploration while armada is army.

Caravel vs Xebec - What's the difference?

caravel | xebec |


As nouns the difference between caravel and xebec

is that caravel is (nautical) a light, usually lateen-rigged sailing ship used by the portuguese, as well as spanish, for about 300 years, beginning in the fifteenth century, first for trade and later for voyages of exploration while xebec is a small, three-masted mediterranean transport ship.

Longship vs Caravel - What's the difference?

longship | caravel |


As nouns the difference between longship and caravel

is that longship is a type of naval vessel made by the vikings while caravel is (nautical) a light, usually lateen-rigged sailing ship used by the portuguese, as well as spanish, for about 300 years, beginning in the fifteenth century, first for trade and later for voyages of exploration.

Valley vs Caravel - What's the difference?

valley | caravel |


As a proper noun valley

is the san fernando valley in southern california.

As a noun caravel is

(nautical) a light, usually lateen-rigged sailing ship used by the portuguese, as well as spanish, for about 300 years, beginning in the fifteenth century, first for trade and later for voyages of exploration.

Caravel vs Fluit - What's the difference?

caravel | fluit |


As nouns the difference between caravel and fluit

is that caravel is (nautical) a light, usually lateen-rigged sailing ship used by the portuguese, as well as spanish, for about 300 years, beginning in the fifteenth century, first for trade and later for voyages of exploration while fluit is flute or the sound it creates.

As a verb fluit is

.

Caravel vs Galleonampflash - What's the difference?

caravel | galleonampflash |

Caravel vs Null - What's the difference?

caravel | null |


As nouns the difference between caravel and null

is that caravel is (nautical) a light, usually lateen-rigged sailing ship used by the portuguese, as well as spanish, for about 300 years, beginning in the fifteenth century, first for trade and later for voyages of exploration while null is zero, nil; the cardinal number before einn.

Schooner vs Caravel - What's the difference?

schooner | caravel |


In nautical|lang=en terms the difference between schooner and caravel

is that schooner is (nautical) a sailing ship with two or more masts, all with fore-and-aft sails; if two masted, having a foremast and a mainmast while caravel is (nautical) a light, usually lateen-rigged sailing ship used by the portuguese, as well as spanish, for about 300 years, beginning in the fifteenth century, first for trade and later for voyages of exploration.

As nouns the difference between schooner and caravel

is that schooner is (nautical) a sailing ship with two or more masts, all with fore-and-aft sails; if two masted, having a foremast and a mainmast while caravel is (nautical) a light, usually lateen-rigged sailing ship used by the portuguese, as well as spanish, for about 300 years, beginning in the fifteenth century, first for trade and later for voyages of exploration.

Caramel vs Caravel - What's the difference?

caramel | caravel |


As nouns the difference between caramel and caravel

is that caramel is a smooth, chewy, sticky confection made by heating sugar and other ingredients until the sugars polymerize and become sticky while caravel is (nautical) a light, usually lateen-rigged sailing ship used by the portuguese, as well as spanish, for about 300 years, beginning in the fifteenth century, first for trade and later for voyages of exploration.

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