bushing

Nut vs Bushing - What's the difference?

nut | bushing |


As nouns the difference between nut and bushing

is that nut is knot while bushing is (mechanical engineering) a type of bearing, a cylindrical lining designed to reduce friction and wear inside a hole, often used as a casing for a shaft, pin or hinge.

Bushing vs Insulator - What's the difference?

bushing | insulator |


As nouns the difference between bushing and insulator

is that bushing is (mechanical engineering) a type of bearing, a cylindrical lining designed to reduce friction and wear inside a hole, often used as a casing for a shaft, pin or hinge while insulator is a substance that does not transmit heat (thermal insulator''), sound (''acoustic insulator'') or electricity (''electrical insulator ).

Culvert vs Bushing - What's the difference?

culvert | bushing |


As nouns the difference between culvert and bushing

is that culvert is a transverse channel under a road or railway for the draining of water while bushing is (mechanical engineering) a type of bearing, a cylindrical lining designed to reduce friction and wear inside a hole, often used as a casing for a shaft, pin or hinge.

As a verb culvert

is to channel (a stream of water) through a.

Bushing vs Connector - What's the difference?

bushing | connector |


As nouns the difference between bushing and connector

is that bushing is (mechanical engineering) a type of bearing, a cylindrical lining designed to reduce friction and wear inside a hole, often used as a casing for a shaft, pin or hinge while connector is one who connects.

Bushing vs Boss - What's the difference?

bushing | boss |


As nouns the difference between bushing and boss

is that bushing is (mechanical engineering) a type of bearing, a cylindrical lining designed to reduce friction and wear inside a hole, often used as a casing for a shaft, pin or hinge while boss is boss (person in charge, supervisor).

Bushing vs Pipe - What's the difference?

bushing | pipe |


As a noun bushing

is (mechanical engineering) a type of bearing, a cylindrical lining designed to reduce friction and wear inside a hole, often used as a casing for a shaft, pin or hinge.

As a proper noun pipe is

.

Bushing vs Choke - What's the difference?

bushing | choke |


As nouns the difference between bushing and choke

is that bushing is (mechanical engineering) a type of bearing, a cylindrical lining designed to reduce friction and wear inside a hole, often used as a casing for a shaft, pin or hinge while choke is a control on a carburetor to adjust the air/fuel mixture when the engine is cold.

As a verb choke is

to be unable to breathe because of obstruction of the windpipe, for instance food or other objects that go down the wrong way.

Coupler vs Bushing - What's the difference?

coupler | bushing |


As nouns the difference between coupler and bushing

is that coupler is someone who couples things together, especially someone whose job it is to couple railway carriages while bushing is (mechanical engineering) a type of bearing, a cylindrical lining designed to reduce friction and wear inside a hole, often used as a casing for a shaft, pin or hinge.

Bushing vs Collar - What's the difference?

bushing | collar |


As nouns the difference between bushing and collar

is that bushing is (mechanical engineering) a type of bearing, a cylindrical lining designed to reduce friction and wear inside a hole, often used as a casing for a shaft, pin or hinge while collar is anything that encircles the neck.

As a verb collar is

to grab or seize by the collar or neck.

Bushing vs Socket - What's the difference?

bushing | socket |


As nouns the difference between bushing and socket

is that bushing is (mechanical engineering) a type of bearing, a cylindrical lining designed to reduce friction and wear inside a hole, often used as a casing for a shaft, pin or hinge while socket is (mechanics) an opening into which a plug or other connecting part is designed to fit (eg a light bulb socket ).

As a verb socket is

to place or fit in a socket.

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