brook

Brook vs Bourn - What's the difference?

brook | bourn |


As nouns the difference between brook and bourn

is that brook is a body of running water smaller than a river; a small stream while bourn is a small stream or brook or bourn can be destination.

As a verb brook

is (transitive|obsolete|except in scots) to use; enjoy; have the full employment of.

Brook vs Strand - What's the difference?

brook | strand |


As verbs the difference between brook and strand

is that brook is (transitive|obsolete|except in scots) to use; enjoy; have the full employment of while strand is (nautical) to run aground; to beach or strand can be to break a strand of (a rope).

As nouns the difference between brook and strand

is that brook is a body of running water smaller than a river; a small stream while strand is the shore or beach of the sea or ocean; shore; beach or strand can be each of the strings which, twisted together, make up a yarn, rope or cord.

Brook vs Puddle - What's the difference?

brook | puddle |


As verbs the difference between brook and puddle

is that brook is (transitive|obsolete|except in scots) to use; enjoy; have the full employment of while puddle is to form a puddle.

As nouns the difference between brook and puddle

is that brook is a body of running water smaller than a river; a small stream while puddle is a small pool of water, usually on a path or road.

What is the difference between stream and brook?

stream | brook |

Brook is a synonym of stream.


As nouns the difference between stream and brook

is that stream is a small river; a large creek; a body of moving water confined by banks while brook is a body of running water smaller than a river; a small stream.

As verbs the difference between stream and brook

is that stream is to flow in a continuous or steady manner, like a liquid while brook is (transitive|obsolete|except in scots) to use; enjoy; have the full employment of.

What is the difference between water and brook?

water | brook |


As nouns the difference between water and brook

is that water is while brook is a body of running water smaller than a river; a small stream.

As a verb brook is

(transitive|obsolete|except in scots) to use; enjoy; have the full employment of.

What is the difference between tolerate and brook?

tolerate | brook |


As verbs the difference between tolerate and brook

is that tolerate is to allow (something that one dislikes or disagrees with) to exist or occur without interference while brook is (transitive|obsolete|except in scots) to use; enjoy; have the full employment of.

As a noun brook is

a body of running water smaller than a river; a small stream.

What is the difference between support and brook?

support | brook |


As nouns the difference between support and brook

is that support is something which supports often used attributively, as a complement or supplement to while brook is a body of running water smaller than a river; a small stream.

As verbs the difference between support and brook

is that support is (senseid)to keep from falling while brook is (transitive|obsolete|except in scots) to use; enjoy; have the full employment of.

What is the difference between endure and brook?

endure | brook |


As verbs the difference between endure and brook

is that endure is to continue or carry on, despite obstacles or hardships while brook is (transitive|obsolete|except in scots) to use; enjoy; have the full employment of.

As a noun brook is

a body of running water smaller than a river; a small stream.

What is the difference between bear and brook?

bear | brook |


As nouns the difference between bear and brook

is that bear is a large omnivorous mammal, related to the dog and raccoon, having shaggy hair, a very small tail, and flat feet; a member of family ursidae, particularly of subfamily (taxlink) while brook is a body of running water smaller than a river; a small stream.

As verbs the difference between bear and brook

is that bear is (finance|transitive) to endeavour to depress the price of, or prices in or bear can be to carry something while brook is (transitive|obsolete|except in scots) to use; enjoy; have the full employment of.

As a adjective bear

is (finance|investments) characterized by or believing to benefit of declining prices in securities markets.

What is the difference between deserve and brook?

deserve | brook |


As verbs the difference between deserve and brook

is that deserve is to be entitled to, as a result of past actions; to be worthy to have while brook is (transitive|obsolete|except in scots) to use; enjoy; have the full employment of.

As a noun brook is

a body of running water smaller than a river; a small stream.

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