bridgehead

Enemy vs Bridgehead - What's the difference?

enemy | bridgehead |


As nouns the difference between enemy and bridgehead

is that enemy is someone who is hostile to, feels hatred towards, opposes the interests of, or intends injury to someone else while bridgehead is an area around the end of a bridge.

As an adjective enemy

is of, relating to, or belonging to an enemy.

Ground vs Bridgehead - What's the difference?

ground | bridgehead |


As nouns the difference between ground and bridgehead

is that ground is (senseid)(uncountable) the surface of the earth, as opposed to the sky or water or underground while bridgehead is an area around the end of a bridge.

As a verb ground

is to connect (an electrical conductor or device) to a ground or ground can be (grind).

As an adjective ground

is crushed, or reduced to small particles.

Fortification vs Bridgehead - What's the difference?

fortification | bridgehead |


As nouns the difference between fortification and bridgehead

is that fortification is the act of fortifying; the art or science of fortifying places to strengthen defence against an enemy while bridgehead is an area around the end of a bridge.

End vs Bridgehead - What's the difference?

end | bridgehead |


As nouns the difference between end and bridgehead

is that end is the final point of something in space or time while bridgehead is an area around the end of a bridge.

As a verb end

is (ergative) to finish, terminate.

Area vs Bridgehead - What's the difference?

area | bridgehead |


As nouns the difference between area and bridgehead

is that area is (mathematics) a measure of the extent of a surface; it is measured in square units while bridgehead is an area around the end of a bridge.

Bridgehead vs Foothold - What's the difference?

bridgehead | foothold |


In context|military|lang=en terms the difference between bridgehead and foothold

is that bridgehead is (military) an area of ground on the enemy's side of a river or other obstacle, especially one that needs to be taken and defended in order to secure an advance while foothold is (military) airhead, beachhead, bridgehead, lodgement.

As nouns the difference between bridgehead and foothold

is that bridgehead is an area around the end of a bridge while foothold is (climbing) a solid grip with the feet.

Bridgehead vs Airhead - What's the difference?

bridgehead | airhead |

Airhead is a see also of bridgehead.

Bridgehead is a related term of airhead.

Bridgehead is a related term of airhead.


In context|military|lang=en terms the difference between bridgehead and airhead

is that bridgehead is (military) an area of ground on the enemy's side of a river or other obstacle, especially one that needs to be taken and defended in order to secure an advance while airhead is (military) an area of hostile territory that has been seized by paratroopers or helicopter-based troops to ensure the further landing of troops and/or materiel.

As nouns the difference between bridgehead and airhead

is that bridgehead is an area around the end of a bridge while airhead is (pejorative) a silly, foolish or unintelligent person or airhead can be a landing area for aircraft for supplying an operation, military or other, usually temporary.

What is the difference between bridgehead and bridge?

bridgehead | bridge |


In context|chemistry|lang=en terms the difference between bridgehead and bridge

is that bridgehead is (chemistry) either of the two atoms in different parts of a molecule that are connected by a bridge while bridge is (chemistry) an intramolecular valence bond, atom or chain of atoms that connects two different parts of a molecule; the atoms so connected being bridgeheads.

As nouns the difference between bridgehead and bridge

is that bridgehead is an area around the end of a bridge while bridge is a construction or natural feature that spans a divide or bridge can be (card games) a card game played with four players playing as two teams of two players each.

As a verb bridge is

to be or make a bridge over something.

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