apple

Dilute vs Apple - What's the difference?

dilute | apple |


As a verb dilute

is to make thinner by adding solvent to a solution; especially by adding water.

As an adjective dilute

is having a low concentration.

As a proper noun apple is

a nickname for new york city, usually “the big apple”.

Happenstance vs Apple - What's the difference?

happenstance | apple |


As a noun happenstance

is (countable) a chance or random event or circumstance.

As a proper noun apple is

a nickname for new york city, usually “the big apple”.

Apple vs Different - What's the difference?

apple | different |


As a proper noun apple

is a nickname for new york city, usually “the big apple”.

As a verb different is

.

Apple vs Die - What's the difference?

apple | die |


As proper nouns the difference between apple and die

is that apple is a nickname for new york city, usually “the big apple” while die is god.

Kern vs Apple - What's the difference?

kern | apple |


As a noun kern

is kernel.

As a proper noun apple is

a nickname for new york city, usually “the big apple”.

Apple vs Silicon - What's the difference?

apple | silicon |


As a proper noun apple

is a nickname for new york city, usually “the big apple”.

As a noun silicon is

silicone.

Apple vs Circumstances - What's the difference?

apple | circumstances |


As a proper noun apple

is a nickname for new york city, usually “the big apple”.

As a noun circumstances is

.

Apple vs Air - What's the difference?

apple | air |


As a proper noun apple

is a nickname for new york city, usually “the big apple”.

As a noun air is

.

Piles vs Apple - What's the difference?

piles | apple |


As a verb piles

is .

As a proper noun apple is

a nickname for new york city, usually “the big apple”.

Apple vs Mountain - What's the difference?

apple | mountain |


As a proper noun apple

is a nickname for new york city, usually “the big apple”.

As a noun mountain is

a large mass of earth and rock, rising above the common level of the earth or adjacent land, usually given by geographers as above 1000 feet in height (or 3048 metres), though such masses may still be described as hills in comparison with larger mountains.

Pages