amiuchi

Net vs Amiuchi - What's the difference?

net | amiuchi |


As nouns the difference between net and amiuchi

is that net is a mesh of string, cord or rope or net can be the amount remaining after expenses are deducted; profit while amiuchi is (sumo) a kimarite in which the attacker throws his opponent behind him by pulling his arm with both hands and twisting backwards; resembles casting a fishing net.

As a verb net

is to catch by means of a net or net can be to receive as profit.

As a adjective net

is (obsolete) good, desirable; clean, decent, clear.

As a adverb net

is after expenses or deductions.

Fishing vs Amiuchi - What's the difference?

fishing | amiuchi |


As nouns the difference between fishing and amiuchi

is that fishing is (label) the act of catching fish while amiuchi is (sumo) a kimarite in which the attacker throws his opponent behind him by pulling his arm with both hands and twisting backwards; resembles casting a fishing net.

As a adjective fishing

is of, about, or pertaining to the act of.

As a verb fishing

is .

Casting vs Amiuchi - What's the difference?

casting | amiuchi |


As nouns the difference between casting and amiuchi

is that casting is the act or process of selecting actors, singers, dancers, models, etc while amiuchi is (sumo) a kimarite in which the attacker throws his opponent behind him by pulling his arm with both hands and twisting backwards; resembles casting a fishing net.

As a verb casting

is .

Backwards vs Amiuchi - What's the difference?

backwards | amiuchi |


As a adjective backwards

is oriented toward the back.

As a adverb backwards

is toward the back.

As a noun amiuchi is

(sumo) a kimarite in which the attacker throws his opponent behind him by pulling his arm with both hands and twisting backwards; resembles casting a fishing net.

Twisting vs Amiuchi - What's the difference?

twisting | amiuchi |


As nouns the difference between twisting and amiuchi

is that twisting is while amiuchi is (sumo) a kimarite in which the attacker throws his opponent behind him by pulling his arm with both hands and twisting backwards; resembles casting a fishing net.

As a verb twisting

is .

As a adjective twisting

is having many twists.

Pulling vs Amiuchi - What's the difference?

pulling | amiuchi |


As nouns the difference between pulling and amiuchi

is that pulling is the act by which something is pulled while amiuchi is (sumo) a kimarite in which the attacker throws his opponent behind him by pulling his arm with both hands and twisting backwards; resembles casting a fishing net.

As a verb pulling

is .

Behind vs Amiuchi - What's the difference?

behind | amiuchi |


As nouns the difference between behind and amiuchi

is that behind is the rear, back-end while amiuchi is (sumo) a kimarite in which the attacker throws his opponent behind him by pulling his arm with both hands and twisting backwards; resembles casting a fishing net.

As a preposition behind

is at the back of.

As a adverb behind

is at the back part; in the rear.

Opponent vs Amiuchi - What's the difference?

opponent | amiuchi |


As nouns the difference between opponent and amiuchi

is that opponent is an individual or group who is a rival of another while amiuchi is (sumo) a kimarite in which the attacker throws his opponent behind him by pulling his arm with both hands and twisting backwards; resembles casting a fishing net.

As a adjective opponent

is situated in front; opposite; hence, opposing; adverse; antagonistic.

Attacker vs Amiuchi - What's the difference?

attacker | amiuchi |


As nouns the difference between attacker and amiuchi

is that attacker is someone who attacks while amiuchi is (sumo) a kimarite in which the attacker throws his opponent behind him by pulling his arm with both hands and twisting backwards; resembles casting a fishing net.

Amiuchi vs Kimarite - What's the difference?

amiuchi | kimarite |

Amiuchi is a see also of kimarite.


As nouns the difference between amiuchi and kimarite

is that amiuchi is (sumo) a kimarite in which the attacker throws his opponent behind him by pulling his arm with both hands and twisting backwards; resembles casting a fishing net while kimarite is (sumo) any of the 82 techniques that may be used to win a match.