accompany

Contain vs Accompany - What's the difference?

contain | accompany |


As verbs the difference between contain and accompany

is that contain is (lb) to hold inside while accompany is to go with or attend as a companion or associate; to keep company with; to go along with.

Compansion vs Accompany - What's the difference?

compansion | accompany |


As a noun compansion

is companding.

As a verb accompany is

to go with or attend as a companion or associate; to keep company with; to go along with.

Come vs Accompany - What's the difference?

come | accompany |


As verbs the difference between come and accompany

is that come is to (to consume food) while accompany is to go with or attend as a companion or associate; to keep company with; to go along with.

Concomitant vs Accompany - What's the difference?

concomitant | accompany |


As an adjective concomitant

is accompanying; conjoined; attending; concurrent.

As a noun concomitant

is something happening or existing at the same time.

As a verb accompany is

to go with or attend as a companion or associate; to keep company with; to go along with.

Accompany vs Join - What's the difference?

accompany | join |


As verbs the difference between accompany and join

is that accompany is to go with or attend as a companion or associate; to keep company with; to go along with while join is to combine more than one item into one; to put together.

As a noun join is

an intersection of piping or wiring; an interconnect.

Go_after vs Accompany - What's the difference?

go_after | accompany | Related terms |

Go_after is a related term of accompany.


As verbs the difference between go_after and accompany

is that go_after is to pursue in attempt to catch another while accompany is to go with or attend as a companion or associate; to keep company with; to go along with.

Bring vs Accompany - What's the difference?

bring | accompany |


As verbs the difference between bring and accompany

is that bring is (lb) to transport toward somebody/somewhere while accompany is to go with or attend as a companion or associate; to keep company with; to go along with.

As an interjection bring

is the sound of a telephone ringing.

Accompany vs Resultant - What's the difference?

accompany | resultant |


As verbs the difference between accompany and resultant

is that accompany is to go with or attend as a companion or associate; to keep company with; to go along with while resultant is .

Pursue vs Accompany - What's the difference?

pursue | accompany | Related terms |

Pursue is a related term of accompany.


In lang=en terms the difference between pursue and accompany

is that pursue is to participate in (an activity, business etc); to practise, follow (a profession) while accompany is to supplement with; add to.

As verbs the difference between pursue and accompany

is that pursue is (obsolete|transitive) to follow with harmful intent; to try to harm, to persecute, torment while accompany is to go with or attend as a companion or associate; to keep company with; to go along with.

Accompany vs Succeed - What's the difference?

accompany | succeed | Related terms |

Accompany is a related term of succeed.


As verbs the difference between accompany and succeed

is that accompany is to go with or attend as a companion or associate; to keep company with; to go along with while succeed is to follow in order; to come next after; hence, to take the place of.

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