abrupt

What is the difference between steep and abrupt?

steep | abrupt |


As adjectives the difference between steep and abrupt

is that steep is of a near-vertical gradient; of a slope, surface, curve, etc that proceeds upward at an angle near vertical while abrupt is {{context|obsolete|rare|lang=en}} broken away (from restraint) {{defdate|attested only in the late 16th century}}{{reference-book | last =| first = | authorlink = | coauthors = | editor =brown, lesley | others = | title = the shorter oxford english dictionary | origdate = | origyear = 1933| origmonth = | url = | format = | accessdate = | accessyear = | accessmonth = | edition = 5th | date = | year =2003| month = | publisher =oxford university press | location =oxford, uk | language = | id = | doi = | isbn =978-0-19-860575-7 | lccn = | ol = | pages =8| chapter = | chapterurl = | quote =}}.

As verbs the difference between steep and abrupt

is that steep is {{context|ambitransitive|lang=en}} to soak an item (or to be soaked) in liquid in order to gradually add or remove components to or from the item while abrupt is {{context|transitive|archaic|lang=en}} to tear off or asunder {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

As nouns the difference between steep and abrupt

is that steep is a liquid used in a steeping process while abrupt is {{context|poetic|lang=en}} something which is [[#adjective|abrupt]]; an abyss {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

What is the difference between impolite and abrupt?

impolite | abrupt |


As adjectives the difference between impolite and abrupt

is that impolite is not polite; not of polished manners; wanting in good manners while abrupt is {{context|obsolete|rare|lang=en}} broken away (from restraint) {{defdate|attested only in the late 16th century}}{{reference-book | last =| first = | authorlink = | coauthors = | editor =brown, lesley | others = | title = the shorter oxford english dictionary | origdate = | origyear = 1933| origmonth = | url = | format = | accessdate = | accessyear = | accessmonth = | edition = 5th | date = | year =2003| month = | publisher =oxford university press | location =oxford, uk | language = | id = | doi = | isbn =978-0-19-860575-7 | lccn = | ol = | pages =8| chapter = | chapterurl = | quote =}}.

As a verb abrupt is

{{context|transitive|archaic|lang=en}} to tear off or asunder {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

As a noun abrupt is

{{context|poetic|lang=en}} something which is [[#adjective|abrupt]]; an abyss {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

What is the difference between craggy and abrupt?

craggy | abrupt |


As adjectives the difference between craggy and abrupt

is that craggy is characterized by rugged, sharp, or coarse features while abrupt is {{context|obsolete|rare|lang=en}} broken away (from restraint) {{defdate|attested only in the late 16th century}}{{reference-book | last =| first = | authorlink = | coauthors = | editor =brown, lesley | others = | title = the shorter oxford english dictionary | origdate = | origyear = 1933| origmonth = | url = | format = | accessdate = | accessyear = | accessmonth = | edition = 5th | date = | year =2003| month = | publisher =oxford university press | location =oxford, uk | language = | id = | doi = | isbn =978-0-19-860575-7 | lccn = | ol = | pages =8| chapter = | chapterurl = | quote =}}.

As a verb abrupt is

{{context|transitive|archaic|lang=en}} to tear off or asunder {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

As a noun abrupt is

{{context|poetic|lang=en}} something which is [[#adjective|abrupt]]; an abyss {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

What is the difference between transitions and abrupt?

transitions | abrupt |


As nouns the difference between transitions and abrupt

is that transitions is (transition) while abrupt is {{context|poetic|lang=en}} something which is [[#adjective|abrupt]]; an abyss {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

As a adjective abrupt is

{{context|obsolete|rare|lang=en}} broken away (from restraint) {{defdate|attested only in the late 16th century}}{{reference-book | last =| first = | authorlink = | coauthors = | editor =brown, lesley | others = | title = the shorter oxford english dictionary | origdate = | origyear = 1933| origmonth = | url = | format = | accessdate = | accessyear = | accessmonth = | edition = 5th | date = | year =2003| month = | publisher =oxford university press | location =oxford, uk | language = | id = | doi = | isbn =978-0-19-860575-7 | lccn = | ol = | pages =8| chapter = | chapterurl = | quote =}}.

As a verb abrupt is

{{context|transitive|archaic|lang=en}} to tear off or asunder {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

What is the difference between unconnected and abrupt?

unconnected | abrupt |


As adjectives the difference between unconnected and abrupt

is that unconnected is not connected or joined while abrupt is {{context|obsolete|rare|lang=en}} broken away (from restraint) {{defdate|attested only in the late 16th century}}{{reference-book | last =| first = | authorlink = | coauthors = | editor =brown, lesley | others = | title = the shorter oxford english dictionary | origdate = | origyear = 1933| origmonth = | url = | format = | accessdate = | accessyear = | accessmonth = | edition = 5th | date = | year =2003| month = | publisher =oxford university press | location =oxford, uk | language = | id = | doi = | isbn =978-0-19-860575-7 | lccn = | ol = | pages =8| chapter = | chapterurl = | quote =}}.

As a verb abrupt is

{{context|transitive|archaic|lang=en}} to tear off or asunder {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

As a noun abrupt is

{{context|poetic|lang=en}} something which is [[#adjective|abrupt]]; an abyss {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

What is the difference between rude and abrupt?

rude | abrupt |


As adjectives the difference between rude and abrupt

is that rude is bad mannered while abrupt is {{context|obsolete|rare|lang=en}} broken away (from restraint) {{defdate|attested only in the late 16th century}}{{reference-book | last =| first = | authorlink = | coauthors = | editor =brown, lesley | others = | title = the shorter oxford english dictionary | origdate = | origyear = 1933| origmonth = | url = | format = | accessdate = | accessyear = | accessmonth = | edition = 5th | date = | year =2003| month = | publisher =oxford university press | location =oxford, uk | language = | id = | doi = | isbn =978-0-19-860575-7 | lccn = | ol = | pages =8| chapter = | chapterurl = | quote =}}.

As a verb abrupt is

{{context|transitive|archaic|lang=en}} to tear off or asunder {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

As a noun abrupt is

{{context|poetic|lang=en}} something which is [[#adjective|abrupt]]; an abyss {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

What is the difference between brusque and abrupt?

brusque | abrupt |


As adjectives the difference between brusque and abrupt

is that brusque is rudely abrupt, unfriendly while abrupt is {{context|obsolete|rare|lang=en}} broken away (from restraint) {{defdate|attested only in the late 16th century}}{{reference-book | last =| first = | authorlink = | coauthors = | editor =brown, lesley | others = | title = the shorter oxford english dictionary | origdate = | origyear = 1933| origmonth = | url = | format = | accessdate = | accessyear = | accessmonth = | edition = 5th | date = | year =2003| month = | publisher =oxford university press | location =oxford, uk | language = | id = | doi = | isbn =978-0-19-860575-7 | lccn = | ol = | pages =8| chapter = | chapterurl = | quote =}}.

As a verb abrupt is

{{context|transitive|archaic|lang=en}} to tear off or asunder {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

As a noun abrupt is

{{context|poetic|lang=en}} something which is [[#adjective|abrupt]]; an abyss {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

What is the difference between sudden and abrupt?

sudden | abrupt |


In context|poetic|lang=en terms the difference between sudden and abrupt

is that sudden is {{context|poetic|lang=en}} suddenly while abrupt is {{context|poetic|lang=en}} something which is [[#adjective|abrupt]]; an abyss {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

In context|obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between sudden and abrupt

is that sudden is {{context|obsolete|lang=en}} an unexpected occurrence; a surprise while abrupt is {{context|obsolete|lang=en}} broken off {{defdate|attested from the early 17th century until the mid 18th century}}.

As adjectives the difference between sudden and abrupt

is that sudden is happening quickly and with little or no warning, snell while abrupt is {{context|obsolete|rare|lang=en}} broken away (from restraint) {{defdate|attested only in the late 16th century}}{{reference-book | last =| first = | authorlink = | coauthors = | editor =brown, lesley | others = | title = the shorter oxford english dictionary | origdate = | origyear = 1933| origmonth = | url = | format = | accessdate = | accessyear = | accessmonth = | edition = 5th | date = | year =2003| month = | publisher =oxford university press | location =oxford, uk | language = | id = | doi = | isbn =978-0-19-860575-7 | lccn = | ol = | pages =8| chapter = | chapterurl = | quote =}}.

As nouns the difference between sudden and abrupt

is that sudden is {{context|obsolete|lang=en}} an unexpected occurrence; a surprise while abrupt is {{context|poetic|lang=en}} something which is [[#adjective|abrupt]]; an abyss {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

As a adverb sudden

is {{context|poetic|lang=en}} suddenly.

As a verb abrupt is

{{context|transitive|archaic|lang=en}} to tear off or asunder {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

What is the difference between unceremonious and abrupt?

unceremonious | abrupt |


As adjectives the difference between unceremonious and abrupt

is that unceremonious is not ceremonious while abrupt is {{context|obsolete|rare|lang=en}} broken away (from restraint) {{defdate|attested only in the late 16th century}}{{reference-book | last =| first = | authorlink = | coauthors = | editor =brown, lesley | others = | title = the shorter oxford english dictionary | origdate = | origyear = 1933| origmonth = | url = | format = | accessdate = | accessyear = | accessmonth = | edition = 5th | date = | year =2003| month = | publisher =oxford university press | location =oxford, uk | language = | id = | doi = | isbn =978-0-19-860575-7 | lccn = | ol = | pages =8| chapter = | chapterurl = | quote =}}.

As a verb abrupt is

{{context|transitive|archaic|lang=en}} to tear off or asunder {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

As a noun abrupt is

{{context|poetic|lang=en}} something which is [[#adjective|abrupt]]; an abyss {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

What is the difference between hasty and abrupt?

hasty | abrupt |


As adjectives the difference between hasty and abrupt

is that hasty is acting in haste; being too hurried or quick (eg without much thinking about it they made a hasty decision to buy it ) while abrupt is {{context|obsolete|rare|lang=en}} broken away (from restraint) {{defdate|attested only in the late 16th century}}{{reference-book | last =| first = | authorlink = | coauthors = | editor =brown, lesley | others = | title = the shorter oxford english dictionary | origdate = | origyear = 1933| origmonth = | url = | format = | accessdate = | accessyear = | accessmonth = | edition = 5th | date = | year =2003| month = | publisher =oxford university press | location =oxford, uk | language = | id = | doi = | isbn =978-0-19-860575-7 | lccn = | ol = | pages =8| chapter = | chapterurl = | quote =}}.

As a verb abrupt is

{{context|transitive|archaic|lang=en}} to tear off or asunder {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

As a noun abrupt is

{{context|poetic|lang=en}} something which is [[#adjective|abrupt]]; an abyss {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}.

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