abnegate

Disaffirm vs Abnegate - What's the difference?

disaffirm | abnegate |


As verbs the difference between disaffirm and abnegate

is that disaffirm is to deny, contradict or repudiate while abnegate is to deny (oneself something); to renounce or give up (a right, a power, a claim, a privilege, a convenience) .

Cancel vs Abnegate - What's the difference?

cancel | abnegate |


In lang=en terms the difference between cancel and abnegate

is that cancel is to offset or equalize something while abnegate is to relinquish; to surrender; to abjure .

As verbs the difference between cancel and abnegate

is that cancel is to cross out something with lines etc while abnegate is to deny (oneself something); to renounce or give up (a right, a power, a claim, a privilege, a convenience) .

As a noun cancel

is a cancellation (us ); (nonstandard in some kinds of english).

Abnegate vs Disallow - What's the difference?

abnegate | disallow | Related terms |

Abnegate is a related term of disallow.


As verbs the difference between abnegate and disallow

is that abnegate is to deny (oneself something); to renounce or give up (a right, a power, a claim, a privilege, a convenience) while disallow is to refuse to allow.

Repudiate vs Abnegate - What's the difference?

repudiate | abnegate |


In lang=en terms the difference between repudiate and abnegate

is that repudiate is to be repudiated while abnegate is to relinquish; to surrender; to abjure .

As verbs the difference between repudiate and abnegate

is that repudiate is to reject the truth or validity of something; to deny while abnegate is to deny (oneself something); to renounce or give up (a right, a power, a claim, a privilege, a convenience) .

Abnegate vs Resign - What's the difference?

abnegate | resign |


In lang=en terms the difference between abnegate and resign

is that abnegate is to relinquish; to surrender; to abjure while resign is to give up or hand over (something to someone); to relinquish ownership of.

As verbs the difference between abnegate and resign

is that abnegate is to deny (oneself something); to renounce or give up (a right, a power, a claim, a privilege, a convenience) while resign is to give up or hand over (something to someone); to relinquish ownership of or resign can be (proscribed).

Abnegate vs Decline - What's the difference?

abnegate | decline |


As verbs the difference between abnegate and decline

is that abnegate is to deny (oneself something); to renounce or give up (a right, a power, a claim, a privilege, a convenience) while decline is .

As an adjective decline is

declined.

Eschew vs Abnegate - What's the difference?

eschew | abnegate |


As verbs the difference between eschew and abnegate

is that eschew is (formal) to avoid; to shun, to shy away from while abnegate is to deny (oneself something); to renounce or give up (a right, a power, a claim, a privilege, a convenience) .

Disown vs Abnegate - What's the difference?

disown | abnegate | Synonyms |

Disown is a synonym of abnegate.


As verbs the difference between disown and abnegate

is that disown is to refuse to own or to refuse to acknowledge one’s own while abnegate is to deny (oneself something); to renounce or give up (a right, a power, a claim, a privilege, a convenience) .

Abnegate vs Disclaim - What's the difference?

abnegate | disclaim |


As verbs the difference between abnegate and disclaim

is that abnegate is to deny (oneself something); to renounce or give up (a right, a power, a claim, a privilege, a convenience) while disclaim is to renounce all claim to; to deny ownership of or responsibility for; to disown; to disavow; to reject.

Disavow vs Abnegate - What's the difference?

disavow | abnegate | Related terms |

Disavow is a related term of abnegate.


As verbs the difference between disavow and abnegate

is that disavow is to refuse strongly and solemnly to own or acknowledge; to deny responsibility for, approbation of, and the like; to disclaim; to disown while abnegate is to deny (oneself something); to renounce or give up (a right, a power, a claim, a privilege, a convenience) .

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