abaft

Abaft vs Backstay - What's the difference?

abaft | backstay |


In context|nautical|lang=en terms the difference between abaft and backstay

is that abaft is (nautical) on the aft side; in the stern while backstay is (nautical) a part of the rigging of a sailing ship extending from masthead the top of the mast to the back of the ship; they support the strain on all upper masts and provide additional support to the shrouds when the wind is abaft the beam.

As a preposition abaft

is (nautical) behind; toward the stern relative to some other object or position; aft of .

As a adverb abaft

is (nautical|obsolete) backwards
.

As a noun backstay is

(nautical) a part of the rigging of a sailing ship extending from masthead the top of the mast to the back of the ship; they support the strain on all upper masts and provide additional support to the shrouds when the wind is abaft the beam.

Abaft vs Astern - What's the difference?

abaft | astern |


In context|nautical|lang=en terms the difference between abaft and astern

is that abaft is (nautical) on the aft side; in the stern while astern is (nautical) behind.

As adverbs the difference between abaft and astern

is that abaft is (nautical|obsolete) backwards
while astern is (label) beyond the stern when viewed from aboard.

As a preposition abaft

is (nautical) behind; toward the stern relative to some other object or position; aft of .

As a adjective astern is

(nautical) behind.

Abaft vs Yawl - What's the difference?

abaft | yawl |


In context|nautical|lang=en terms the difference between abaft and yawl

is that abaft is (nautical) on the aft side; in the stern while yawl is (nautical) a fore and aft rigged sailing vessel with two masts, main and mizzen, the mizzen stepped abaft the rudder post.

As a preposition abaft

is (nautical) behind; toward the stern relative to some other object or position; aft of .

As a adverb abaft

is (nautical|obsolete) backwards
.

As a noun yawl is

(nautical) a small ship's boat, usually rowed by four or six oars.

As a verb yawl is

to cry out; to howl;.

What is the difference between after and abaft?

after | abaft | Related terms |

After is a related term of abaft.


As adverbs the difference between after and abaft

is that after is behind; later in time; following while abaft is {{context|nautical|obsolete|lang=en}} backwards {{defdate|attested from around (1150 to 1350) until the late 15th century}}{{reference-book | last =| first = | authorlink = | coauthors = | editor =brown, lesley | others = | title = the shorter oxford english dictionary | origdate = | origyear = 1933| origmonth = | url = | format = | accessdate = | accessyear = | accessmonth = | edition = 5th | date = | year =2003| month = | publisher =oxford university press | location =oxford, uk | language = | id = | doi = | isbn =978-0-19-860575-7 | lccn = | ol = | pages =2| chapter = | chapterurl = | quote =}}.

As prepositions the difference between after and abaft

is that after is subsequently to; following in time; later than while abaft is {{context|nautical|lang=en}} behind; toward the stern relative to some other object or position; aft of {{defdate|first attested around the late 15th century}}.

As a conjunction after

is (signifies that the action of the clause it starts takes place before the action of the other clause).

As a adjective after

is {{context|dated|lang=en}} later; second (of two); next, following, subsequent.

What is the difference between wheelhouse and abaft?

wheelhouse | abaft |


In context|nautical|lang=en terms the difference between wheelhouse and abaft

is that wheelhouse is {{context|nautical|lang=en}} the enclosed structure around side paddlewheels on a steamboat while abaft is {{context|nautical|lang=en}} on the aft side; in the stern {{defdate|first attested in the early 17th century}}.

As a noun wheelhouse

is {{context|nautical|lang=en}} an enclosed compartment, on the deck of a vessel such as a fishing boat, from which it may be navigated; on a larger vessel it is the bridge or pilothouse.

As a preposition abaft is

{{context|nautical|lang=en}} behind; toward the stern relative to some other object or position; aft of {{defdate|first attested around the late 15th century}}.

As a adverb abaft is

{{context|nautical|obsolete|lang=en}} backwards {{defdate|attested from around (1150 to 1350) until the late 15th century}}{{reference-book | last =| first = | authorlink = | coauthors = | editor =brown, lesley | others = | title = the shorter oxford english dictionary | origdate = | origyear = 1933| origmonth = | url = | format = | accessdate = | accessyear = | accessmonth = | edition = 5th | date = | year =2003| month = | publisher =oxford university press | location =oxford, uk | language = | id = | doi = | isbn =978-0-19-860575-7 | lccn = | ol = | pages =2| chapter = | chapterurl = | quote =}}.

What is the difference between wheelhouse and abaft?

wheelhouse | abaft |


In context|nautical|lang=en terms the difference between wheelhouse and abaft

is that wheelhouse is {{context|nautical|lang=en}} the enclosed structure around side paddlewheels on a steamboat while abaft is {{context|nautical|lang=en}} on the aft side; in the stern {{defdate|first attested in the early 17th century}}.

As a noun wheelhouse

is {{context|nautical|lang=en}} an enclosed compartment, on the deck of a vessel such as a fishing boat, from which it may be navigated; on a larger vessel it is the bridge or pilothouse.

As a preposition abaft is

{{context|nautical|lang=en}} behind; toward the stern relative to some other object or position; aft of {{defdate|first attested around the late 15th century}}.

As a adverb abaft is

{{context|nautical|obsolete|lang=en}} backwards {{defdate|attested from around (1150 to 1350) until the late 15th century}}{{reference-book | last =| first = | authorlink = | coauthors = | editor =brown, lesley | others = | title = the shorter oxford english dictionary | origdate = | origyear = 1933| origmonth = | url = | format = | accessdate = | accessyear = | accessmonth = | edition = 5th | date = | year =2003| month = | publisher =oxford university press | location =oxford, uk | language = | id = | doi = | isbn =978-0-19-860575-7 | lccn = | ol = | pages =2| chapter = | chapterurl = | quote =}}.

What is the difference between abaft and aft?

abaft | aft | Synonyms |

Abaft is a synonym of aft.


In context|nautical|lang=en terms the difference between abaft and aft

is that abaft is {{context|nautical|lang=en}} on the aft side; in the stern {{defdate|first attested in the early 17th century}} while aft is {{context|nautical|lang=en}} at, near, or towards the stern of a vessel (with the frame of reference within the vessel).

As adverbs the difference between abaft and aft

is that abaft is {{context|nautical|obsolete|lang=en}} backwards {{defdate|attested from around (1150 to 1350) until the late 15th century}}{{reference-book | last =| first = | authorlink = | coauthors = | editor =brown, lesley | others = | title = the shorter oxford english dictionary | origdate = | origyear = 1933| origmonth = | url = | format = | accessdate = | accessyear = | accessmonth = | edition = 5th | date = | year =2003| month = | publisher =oxford university press | location =oxford, uk | language = | id = | doi = | isbn =978-0-19-860575-7 | lccn = | ol = | pages =2| chapter = | chapterurl = | quote =}} while aft is {{context|nautical|lang=en}} at, near, or towards the stern of a vessel (with the frame of reference within the vessel).

As a preposition abaft

is {{context|nautical|lang=en}} behind; toward the stern relative to some other object or position; aft of {{defdate|first attested around the late 15th century}}.

As a noun aft is

{{context|nautical|lang=en}} the stern portion of a vessel.

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