Scope vs Category - What's the difference?

scope | category |


As nouns the difference between scope and category

is that scope is the breadth, depth or reach of a subject; a domain while category is a group, often named or numbered, to which items are assigned based on similarity or defined criteria.

As a verb scope

is to perform a cursory investigation, as to scope out .

scope

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • The breadth, depth or reach of a subject; a domain.
  • A device used in aiming a projectile, through which the person aiming looks at the intended target
  • (computing) The region of program source in which an identifier is meaningful.
  • (logic) The shortest sub-wff of which a given instance of a logical connective is a part.
  • (linguistics) The region of an utterance to which some modifying element applies.
  • the scope of an adverb
  • (slang) Shortened form of periscope, telescope, microscope or oscilloscope.
  • Derived terms

    * scopeless

    Verb

    (scop)
  • To perform a cursory investigation, as to scope out .
  • (slang) To perform arthroscopic surgery.
  • The surgeon will scope the football player's knee to repair damage to a ligament.
  • (slang) To examine under a microscope.
  • The entomologist explained that he could not tell what species of springtail we were looking at without scoping it.

    Anagrams

    * copes * copse ----

    category

    Noun

    (categories)
  • A group, often named or numbered, to which items are assigned based on similarity or defined criteria.
  • *
  • The traditional way of describing the similarities and differences between constituents is to say that they belong to categories'' of various types. Thus, words like ''boy'', ''girl'', ''man'', ''woman'', etc. are traditionally said to belong to the category''' of Nouns, whereas words like ''a'', ''the'', ''this'', and ''that'' are traditionally said to belong to the ' category of Determiners.
    This steep and dangerous climb belongs to the most difficult category .
    I wouldn't put this book in the same category as the author's first novel.
  • (mathematics) A collection of objects, together with a transitively closed collection of composable arrows between them, such that every object has an identity arrow, and such that arrow composition is associative.
  • One well-known category has sets as objects and functions as arrows.
    Just as a monoid consists of an underlying set with a binary operation "on top of it" which is closed, associative and with an identity, a category consists of an underlying digraph with an arrow composition operation "on top of it" which is transitively closed, associative, and with an identity at each object. In fact, a category's composition operation, when restricted to a single one of its objects, turns that object's set of arrows (which would all be loops) into a monoid.

    Synonyms

    * (group to which items are assigned) class, family, genus, group, kingdom, order, phylum, race, tribe, type * See also

    Derived terms

    * category mistake * category theory * conceptual category * perceptual category * subcategory * supercategory