Mask vs Casing - What's the difference?

mask | casing |


As nouns the difference between mask and casing

is that mask is a cover, or partial cover, for the face, used for disguise or protection or mask can be a mesh or mask can be mash while casing is that which encloses or encases.

As verbs the difference between mask and casing

is that mask is to cover, as the face, by way of concealment or defense against injury; to conceal with a mask or visor or mask can be to mash or mask can be to bewilder; confuse while casing is .

mask

English

(wikipedia mask)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) . . * Derived from the -r- form: (etyl) maschera, (etyl) and (etyl) , (etyl) masker, (etyl) masquerade. * Derived from the form lacking -r- : German Maske and Swedish mask.

Alternative forms

* (l)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A cover, or partial cover, for the face, used for disguise or protection.
  • a dancer's mask'''; a fencer's '''mask'''; a ball player's '''mask
  • That which disguises; a pretext or subterfuge.
  • A festive entertainment of dancing or other diversions, where all wear masks; a masquerade
  • (Francis Bacon)
  • * (rfdate) :
  • This thought might lead me through the world's vain mask .
  • (obsolete) A dramatic performance, formerly in vogue, in which the actors wore masks and represented mythical or allegorical characters.
  • (architecture) A grotesque head or face, used to adorn keystones and other prominent parts, to spout water in fountains, and the like; -- called also mascaron.
  • (fortification) In a permanent fortification, a redoubt which protects the caponiere.
  • (fortification) A screen for a battery
  • (zoology) The lower lip of the larva of a dragonfly, modified so as to form a prehensile organ.
  • (Puebloan, anthropology) A ceremonial object used in Puebloan kachina cults that resembles a Euro-American masks. (The term is objected as an appropriate translation by Puebloan peoples as it emphasizes imitation but ignores power and representational intent.)
  • (computing, programming) A pattern of bits used in bitwise operations; bitmask.
  • (computer graphics) A two-color (black and white) bitmap generated from an image, used to create transparency in the image.
  • Hyponyms
    * (a cover for the face) (l), (l)
    Derived terms
    * dust mask * death mask * gas mask, gasmask * mask house(qualifier) * screen mask * unmask

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cover, as the face, by way of concealment or defense against injury; to conceal with a mask or visor.
  • * (rfdate) Shakespeare, Merry Wives of Windsor, IV,vi :
  • They must all be masked and vizarded
  • To disguise; to cover; to hide.
  • * (rfdate) Shakespeare, Macbeth, III-i :
  • Masking the business from the common eye
  • (military) To conceal; also, to intervene in the line of.
  • (military) To cover or keep in check.
  • to mask a body of troops or a fortess by a superior force, while some hostile evolution is being carried out
  • To take part as a masker in a masquerade
  • (Cavendish)
  • To wear a mask; to be disguised in any way
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (computing) To set or unset (certain bits, or binary digits, within a value) by means of a bitmask.
  • * 1993 , Richard E. Haskell, Introduction to computer engineering (page 287)
  • That is, the lower nibble (the 4 bits 1010 = A) has been masked to zero. This is because ANDing anything with a zero produces a zero, while ANDing any bit with a 1 leaves the bit unchanged
  • (computing) To disable (an interrupt, etc.) by unsetting the associated bit.
  • * 1998 , Rick Grehan, ?Robert Moote, ?Ingo Cyliax, Real-time programming: a guide to 32-bit embedded development
  • When should you mask a specific interrupt, rather than disabling all interrupts?

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) maske, from (etyl) max, .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A mesh.
  • The mesh of a net; a net; net-bag.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) . More at (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Mash.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To mash.
  • (brewing) To mix malt with hot water to yield wort.
  • To prepare tea in a teapot; alternative to brew.
  • Etymology 4

    From (etyl) masken, short for . More at (l).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To bewilder; confuse.
  • References

    Anagrams

    * ----

    casing

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • That which encloses or encases.
  • Some people like to split the casing of a sausage before cooking so it doesn't burst. Others don't.
  • (uncountable, computing) The collective states of upper and lower case letters.
  • The replacement string should have the same casing as the matched text.

    Derived terms

    * sausage casing

    Verb

    (head)
  • Anagrams

    *