Carouses vs Carousel - What's the difference?

carouses | carousel |


As a verb carouses

is (carouse).

As a noun carousel is

a merry-go-round.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

carouses

English

Verb

(head)
  • (carouse)

  • carouse

    English

    Verb

    (carous)
  • To engage in a noisy or drunken social gathering.
  • We are all going to carouse at Brian's tonight.
  • To drink to excess.
  • If I survive this headache, I promise no more carousing at Brian's.

    Derived terms

    * carousal * carousel * carrousel

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A large draught of liquor.
  • * Sir J. Davies
  • a full carouse of sack
  • * Shakespeare
  • Drink carouses to the next day's fate.
  • A drinking match; a carousal.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • The early feast and late carouse .

    Anagrams

    *

    carousel

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • a merry-go-round
  • a continuously revolving device for item delivery
  • After collecting his suitcase at the baggage carousel , he left the airport.
  • the rotating glass plate in a microwave oven
  • A visual component that displays a series of images one at a time.
  • Derived terms

    * carousel fraud * carousel voting