Aroused vs Caroused - What's the difference?

aroused | caroused |


As verbs the difference between aroused and caroused

is that aroused is (arouse) while caroused is (carouse).

aroused

English

Verb

(head)
  • (arouse)

  • arouse

    English

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • To stimulate feelings.
  • :
  • :
  • *
  • *:“?My tastes,” he said, still smiling, “?incline me to the garishly sunlit side of this planet.” And, to tease her and arouse her to combat?: “?I prefer a farandole to a nocturne?; I'd rather have a painting than an etching?; Mr. Whistler bores me with his monochromatic mud; I don't like dull colours, dull sounds, dull intellects;.”
  • *{{quote-book, year=1913, author=
  • , chapter=5, title= Lord Stranleigh Abroad , passage=She removed Stranleigh’s coat with a dexterity that aroused his imagination.}}
  • To sexually stimulate.
  • :
  • To wake from sleep or stupor.
  • :
  • See also

    * arousal * aroused

    Anagrams

    *

    caroused

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (carouse)

  • carouse

    English

    Verb

    (carous)
  • To engage in a noisy or drunken social gathering.
  • We are all going to carouse at Brian's tonight.
  • To drink to excess.
  • If I survive this headache, I promise no more carousing at Brian's.

    Derived terms

    * carousal * carousel * carrousel

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A large draught of liquor.
  • * Sir J. Davies
  • a full carouse of sack
  • * Shakespeare
  • Drink carouses to the next day's fate.
  • A drinking match; a carousal.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • The early feast and late carouse .

    Anagrams

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