Cart vs Caret - What's the difference?

cart | caret |


As nouns the difference between cart and caret

is that cart is to split, kill, put (to death) while caret is a mark: ⟨  ⟩ used by writers and proof readers to indicate that something is to be inserted in the place marked by the caret or caret can be a kind of turtle, the hawksbill.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

cart

English

(wikipedia cart)

Etymology 1

Probably from Old English .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A small, open, wheeled vehicle, drawn or pushed by a person or animal, more often used for transporting goods than passengers.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=We made an odd party before the arrival of the Ten, particularly when the Celebrity dropped in for lunch or dinner. He could not be induced to remain permanently at Mohair because Miss Trevor was at Asquith, but he appropriated a Hempstead cart from the Mohair stables and made the trip sometimes twice in a day.}}
  • A small motor vehicle resembling a car; a go-cart.
  • Derived terms
    * cartwheel * dogcart * go-cart * golf cart * luggage cart * oxcart * pushcart * put the cart before the horse * shopping cart

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To carry goods.
  • I've been carting these things around all day .
  • To carry or convey in a cart.
  • (obsolete) To expose in a cart by way of punishment.
  • * Prior
  • She chuckled when a bawd was carted .

    References

    Etymology 2

    Shortened from (cartridge).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (video games, informal) A cartridge for a video game system.
  • My ''Final Fantasy'' cart on the NES is still alive and kicking.

    Anagrams

    * *

    caret

    English

    Etymology 1

    From the (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A mark: ?  ? used by writers and proof readers to indicate that something is to be inserted in the place marked by the caret.
  • (graphical user interface) An indicator, often a blinking line or bar, indicating where the next insertion or other edit will take place. Also called a cursor.
  • (non-standard) A .
  • * 1944 , Maro Beath Jones, Inclusive Uniform Alphabet for Russian, Bulgarian, Serb-Croatian, Czech, Polish'' (''Claremont Slavic Series , ), page 10
  • […] the more conventional semivocalic j and the caret (?) respectively.
  • * 1948 , Bohumil Emil Mikula, Progressive Czech (Bohemian) (: Czechoslovak National Council of America), 6
  • The caret' (?), '''há?ek''', is used over the following consonants: '''c''', '''d''', '''n''', '''t''', '''r''', '''s''', and '''z''' to indicate the soft sound. The '''caret''' (?) is also used over the vowel ' e (See Pronunciation II, b, p, v).
  • * 1991 , Michael Shapiro, The Sense of Change: Language as History (; ISBN 0253352037, 9780253352033), page 58
  • In contemporary Czech, the “hook” or caret' is no longer in use for lower-case ''t'' and ''d'' when the latter are palatal; instead, an apostrophe is used (''t’'', ''d’'') This development is clearly connected with the practical difficulty encountered in printing a ' caret over letter stems that are too thin.
    Derived terms
    *

    Etymology 2

    (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A kind of turtle, the hawksbill.
  • (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

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