Dared vs Cared - What's the difference?

dared | cared |


As verbs the difference between dared and cared

is that dared is (dare) while cared is (care).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

dared

English

Verb

(head)
  • (dare)
  • Anagrams

    * * *

    dare

    English

    (wikipedia dare)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) durran, from (etyl) .

    Verb

  • To have enough courage (to do something).
  • I wouldn't dare argue with my boss.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The fellow dares not deceive me.
  • * Macaulay
  • Why then did not the ministers use their new law? Because they durst not, because they could not.
  • To defy or challenge (someone to do something)
  • I dare you to kiss that girl.
  • To have enough courage to meet or do something, go somewhere, etc.; to face up to
  • Will you dare death to reach your goal?
  • * The Century
  • To wrest it from barbarism, to dare its solitudes.
  • To terrify; to daunt.
  • * Beaumont and Fletcher
  • For I have done those follies, those mad mischiefs, / Would dare a woman.
  • To catch (larks) by producing terror through the use of mirrors, scarlet cloth, a hawk, etc., so that they lie still till a net is thrown over them.
  • (Nares)
    Usage notes
    * Dare is a semimodal verb. The speaker can choose whether to use the auxiliary "to" when forming negative and interrogative sentences. For example, "I don't dare (to) go" and "I dare not go" are both correct. Similarly "Dare you go?" and "Do you dare (to) go?" are both correct. * In negative and interrogative sentences where "do" is not used, the third-person singular form of the verb is usually "dare" and not "dares": "Dare he go? He dare not go." * Colloquially, "dare not" can be contracted to "daren't". * The expression dare say'', used almost exclusively in the first-person singular and in the present tense, means "think probable". It is also spelt ''daresay . * Historically, the simple past of dare was durst. In the 1830s, it was overtaken by dared, which has been markedly more common ever since.
    Derived terms
    * daredevil * daren't * daresay * daresn't

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A challenge to prove courage.
  • The quality of daring; venturesomeness; boldness.
  • * Shakespeare
  • It lends a lustre / A large dare to our great enterprise.
  • defiance; challenge
  • * Chapman
  • Childish, unworthy dares / Are not enought to part our powers.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Sextus Pompeius / Hath given the dare to Caesar.

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) darian.

    Verb

    (dar)
  • (obsolete) To stare stupidly or vacantly; to gaze as though amazed or terrified.
  • (obsolete) To lie or crouch down in fear.
  • *, Bk.XX, ch.xix:
  • *:‘Sir, here bene knyghtes com of kyngis blod that woll nat longe droupe and dare within thys wallys.’
  • Etymology 3

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A small fish, the dace.
  • * 1766 , Richard Brookes, The art of angling, rock and sea-fishing
  • The Dare is not unlike a Chub, but proportionably less; his Body is more white and flatter, and his Tail more forked.
    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    * ----

    cared

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (care)
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    care

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) (m), . See (m).

    Noun

  • (obsolete) Grief, sorrow.
  • *, Bk.V:
  • *:Than Feraunte his cosyn had grete care and cryed full lowde.
  • Close attention; concern; responsibility.
  • :
  • *Shakespeare
  • *:I thank thee for thy care and honest pains.
  • Worry.
  • :
  • Maintenance, upkeep.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Beside those things that are without, that which cometh upon me daily, the care of all the churches.
  • The treatment of those in need (especially as a profession).
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-21, author= Karen McVeigh
  • , volume=189, issue=2, page=10, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= US rules human genes can't be patented , passage=The US supreme court has ruled unanimously that natural human genes cannot be patented, a decision that scientists and civil rights campaigners said removed a major barrier to patient care and medical innovation.}}
  • The state of being cared for by others.
  • :
  • The object of watchful attention or anxiety.
  • *Spenser
  • *:Right sorrowfully mourning her bereaved cares .
  • Derived terms
    * caregiving * Care Sunday * managed care * primary care * secondary care * take care of * tertiary care
    Quotations
    * 1925 , Walter Anthony and Tom Reed (titles), Rupert Julian (director), The Phantom of the Opera , silent movie *: ‘Have a care , Buquet—ghosts like not to be seen or talked about!’

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (car)
  • (label) To be concerned about, have an interest in.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1959, author=(Georgette Heyer), title=(The Unknown Ajax), chapter=1
  • , passage=And no use for anyone to tell Charles that this was because the Family was in mourning for Mr Granville Darracott […]: Charles might only have been second footman at Darracott Place for a couple of months when that disaster occurred, but no one could gammon him into thinking that my lord cared a spangle for his heir.}}
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=May 27, author=Nathan Rabin, work=The Onion AV Club
  • , title= TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “New Kid On The Block” (season 4, episode 8; originally aired 11/12/1992) , passage=This newfound infatuation renders Bart uncharacteristically vulnerable. He suddenly has something to care about beyond causing trouble and makes a dramatic transformation from hell-raiser to gentleman about town.}}
  • (label) To look after.
  • (label) To be mindful of.
  • Polite or formal way to say want.
  • Usage notes
    * Sense 4. Most commonly found as an interrogative or negative sentence. * Sense 4. This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive . See
    Derived terms
    * becare * care for

    Statistics

    *