Caret vs Cared - What's the difference?

caret | cared |


As a noun caret

is a mark: ⟨  ⟩ used by writers and proof readers to indicate that something is to be inserted in the place marked by the caret or caret can be a kind of turtle, the hawksbill.

As a verb cared is

(care).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

caret

English

Etymology 1

From the (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A mark: ?  ? used by writers and proof readers to indicate that something is to be inserted in the place marked by the caret.
  • (graphical user interface) An indicator, often a blinking line or bar, indicating where the next insertion or other edit will take place. Also called a cursor.
  • (non-standard) A .
  • * 1944 , Maro Beath Jones, Inclusive Uniform Alphabet for Russian, Bulgarian, Serb-Croatian, Czech, Polish'' (''Claremont Slavic Series , ), page 10
  • […] the more conventional semivocalic j and the caret (?) respectively.
  • * 1948 , Bohumil Emil Mikula, Progressive Czech (Bohemian) (: Czechoslovak National Council of America), 6
  • The caret' (?), '''há?ek''', is used over the following consonants: '''c''', '''d''', '''n''', '''t''', '''r''', '''s''', and '''z''' to indicate the soft sound. The '''caret''' (?) is also used over the vowel ' e (See Pronunciation II, b, p, v).
  • * 1991 , Michael Shapiro, The Sense of Change: Language as History (; ISBN 0253352037, 9780253352033), page 58
  • In contemporary Czech, the “hook” or caret' is no longer in use for lower-case ''t'' and ''d'' when the latter are palatal; instead, an apostrophe is used (''t’'', ''d’'') This development is clearly connected with the practical difficulty encountered in printing a ' caret over letter stems that are too thin.
    Derived terms
    *

    Etymology 2

    (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A kind of turtle, the hawksbill.
  • (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    * ----

    cared

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (care)
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    care

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) (m), . See (m).

    Noun

  • (obsolete) Grief, sorrow.
  • *, Bk.V:
  • *:Than Feraunte his cosyn had grete care and cryed full lowde.
  • Close attention; concern; responsibility.
  • :
  • *Shakespeare
  • *:I thank thee for thy care and honest pains.
  • Worry.
  • :
  • Maintenance, upkeep.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Beside those things that are without, that which cometh upon me daily, the care of all the churches.
  • The treatment of those in need (especially as a profession).
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-21, author= Karen McVeigh
  • , volume=189, issue=2, page=10, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= US rules human genes can't be patented , passage=The US supreme court has ruled unanimously that natural human genes cannot be patented, a decision that scientists and civil rights campaigners said removed a major barrier to patient care and medical innovation.}}
  • The state of being cared for by others.
  • :
  • The object of watchful attention or anxiety.
  • *Spenser
  • *:Right sorrowfully mourning her bereaved cares .
  • Derived terms
    * caregiving * Care Sunday * managed care * primary care * secondary care * take care of * tertiary care
    Quotations
    * 1925 , Walter Anthony and Tom Reed (titles), Rupert Julian (director), The Phantom of the Opera , silent movie *: ‘Have a care , Buquet—ghosts like not to be seen or talked about!’

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (car)
  • (label) To be concerned about, have an interest in.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1959, author=(Georgette Heyer), title=(The Unknown Ajax), chapter=1
  • , passage=And no use for anyone to tell Charles that this was because the Family was in mourning for Mr Granville Darracott […]: Charles might only have been second footman at Darracott Place for a couple of months when that disaster occurred, but no one could gammon him into thinking that my lord cared a spangle for his heir.}}
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=May 27, author=Nathan Rabin, work=The Onion AV Club
  • , title= TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “New Kid On The Block” (season 4, episode 8; originally aired 11/12/1992) , passage=This newfound infatuation renders Bart uncharacteristically vulnerable. He suddenly has something to care about beyond causing trouble and makes a dramatic transformation from hell-raiser to gentleman about town.}}
  • (label) To look after.
  • (label) To be mindful of.
  • Polite or formal way to say want.
  • Usage notes
    * Sense 4. Most commonly found as an interrogative or negative sentence. * Sense 4. This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive . See
    Derived terms
    * becare * care for

    Statistics

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